Radioactive waste shipment arrives in Aomori

AOMORI —

A cargo ship carrying high-level radioactive vitrified waste arrived in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, from Britain on Thursday.

The shipment of 76 cylinders of nuclear waste reprocessed on behalf of three Japanese power companies arrived in Japan for the first time since the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant following the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

The cylinders are to be placed in a storage facility of Japan Nuclear Fuel in Rokkasho for the time being, officials said.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

  • 0

    Papigiulio

    The cylinders are to be placed in a storage facility of Japan Nuclear Fuel in Rokkasho for the time being, officials said.

    Well theres nothing much else to be done with it. Why Japan? Especially after the nuclear incident with Fukushima. Sod off with all the nuclear waste. Store it somewhere in Siberia ffs

  • 0

    buggerlugs

    I think if you read a little more carefully, you'll see it states that this was Japanese material reprocessed by Britain and now delivered back to it's origin.

  • 0

    Asagao

    I like the "for the time being" bit. In twenty years time some office worker will lose the paperwork, and then they won't need to bother with building a fireproof, tsunami proof, earthquake proof, corrosion proof, storage place that needs to be maintained and regularly inspected for over 2000 years.

  • 1

    Darren Brannan

    meanwhile, in Kanto...this is where the sludge and ash is being buried in Haneda, Tokyo.and has been since May..and the area in the ocean where Yokohama want to dump theirs.. http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2011/09/radioactive-landfill-tokyo-metropolitan.html

  • 0

    goinggoinggone

    Japan really is finished, isn't it.

  • 1

    SquidBert

    I think if you read a little more carefully, you'll see it states that this was Japanese material reprocessed by Britain and now delivered back to it's origin.

    Yes, other news sourcess also states this clearly. Other news sources also mentions protesters shouting "Keep the waste out!".

    All though I sympathize with them not wanting the waste to be stored in their back yard, if you do not want nuclear waste then how about not producing it at all. If you do not want waste, then convince your government to move quickly to alternative energy sources.

  • 1

    zichi

    Britain, France, Germany and Japan Big Nuke have a close relationship for reprocessing spent nuke fuel. Japan has no permanent location for storing the reprocessed fuel which is why the nuke power plant cooling pools are full with decades of it.

    This was fuel sent to Britain and now is returned.

    However, America too is having a problem with over filled cooling pools and sent some of its spent fuel rods to Fukushima for storage.

    Even if all the nuke reactors were shut down, there remains the very serious problem of millions of tons of spent and reprocessed fuel with a life of more than 10,000 years.

  • 0

    NuckinFutz

    Gee thanks! I live 40 kilometers from the Rokkasho "nuke dump" and that place is an accident waiting to happen.

  • 0

    zichi

    Rokkasho isn't suppose to be for spent fuel storage?

  • 0

    SquidBert

    @zichi

    Rokkasho has facilities for storage of low level wast and temporary storage of high level waste.

    They also have facilities for reprocessing of nuclear fuel and for production of Mixed oxide fuel.

    I think they were planning on accepting long term storage, but the deal fell through when the next generation of ITER (test reactor for fusion) was placed in Cadarache, France and not in Rokkasho as the local government had been promised. If they would have gotten the ITER it would have been.

    Wikipedia states the following about ITER:

    "ITER was originally expected to cost approximately €5billion, but the rising price of raw materials and changes to the initial design have seen that amount more than triple to €16billion"

    So that would have been a substantial amount of money and jobs created in the region, which probably blinded the local government to any of the problems with accepting long time storage facilities.

    I remember reading something about Rokkasho getting some advanced HPC simulation center to help save face.

  • 0

    zichi

    SqidBert,

    yes, sorry I was only talking about high level waste like spent fuel.

  • 0

    SquidBert

    zichi,

    Yes, so then I think the answer is that they have facilities for Short term storage. And they might get facilities for long term storage, but status of this is a bit unclear atm.

  • 0

    zichi

    Since the area around the Fukushima Daiichi plant will be zoned off for decades or even hundreds of years, that is the location to build long term nuke waste storage.

  • 0

    SquidBert

    @zichi,

    So it would seem, but you want to locate this type of storage someplace that will be geologically predictable for thousands an thousands of years (does that even exist in Japan?) so I think their main criteria for choosing location has been to find stable bedrock to dig into. Well that and any place that had a local government that would accept their deals.

    Now for lower level waste, such as the ash from incinerators and landmasses from decontamination areas etc, an extended Fukushima NoGo zone may be the logical place for that.

  • 0

    zichi

    There is bedrock under Fukushima. The exclusion zone should be increased to 30-40km and should no longer be part of the prefecture but instead under direct control from Tokyo.

    Nuclear waste does not need to go deep into the ground just placed in dry caskets and stored in an earthquake and water tight storage.

  • 1

    SquidBert

    There is bedrock under Fukushima.

    Bedrock, yes. Stable? Not so sure.

    Nuclear waste does not need to go deep into the ground just placed in dry caskets and stored in an earthquake and water tight storage.

    The problem is finding drycaskets that stay dry for thousands of years, metal will corrode and corrosion is aided by the radiation. They typically want this to be deep enough to be below the ground water table.

    If the right conditions can be met in the No Go zone, then I am all for it.

  • 0

    Utrack

    Smarter Use of Nuclear Waste: Fast-neutron reactors could extract much more energy from recycled nuclear fuel, minimize the risks of weapons proliferation and markedly reduce the time nuclear waste must be isolated

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=smarter-use-of-nuclear-waste

    Excerpt: In particular, a relatively new form of nuclear technology could overcome the principal drawbacks of current methods—namely, worries about reactor accidents, the potential for diversion of nuclear fuel into highly destructive weapons, the management of dangerous, long-lived radioactive waste, and the depletion of global reserves of economically available uranium. This nuclear fuel cycle would combine two innovations: pyrometallurgical processing (a high-temperature method of recycling reactor waste into fuel) and advanced fast-neutron reactors capable of burning that fuel. With this approach, the radioactivity from the generated waste could drop to safe levels in a few hundred years, thereby eliminating the need to segregate waste for tens of thousands of years.

Login to leave a comment

OR
Continuing Education: Seminars and Workshops in April

Continuing Education: Seminars and Workshops in April

Temple University, Japan CampusContinuing Education / MBA

Undergraduate: Information session (April 9)

Undergraduate: Information session (April 9)

Temple University, Japan CampusContinuing Education / MBA

Special Offers

Work
in Japan

Search the Largest English Job Board in Japan.

Find a Job Now!

More in National

View all

View all

Time
to Buy
in Japan

Find the perfect home today!

Search