Record 2.38 mil registered foreigners living in Japan in 2016

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  • -5

    gogogo

    Yah?

  • -6

    buffalo

    Well said @gogogo

  • 2

    Yubaru

    Among those illegally staying in Japan, 13,265 were from South Korea, 8,846 from China and 6,507 from Thailand, the ministry said. The number of Vietnamese also grew in the category, up 34.9 percent to 5,137, as some trainees are believed to have been staying even after their resident status expired.

    If they are staying illegally what is being done about it? If the exact numbers are known, then it's pretty safe to say that the authorities probably have a decent idea where these people are as well.

    I am not a fan of Japan's not allowing refugees into the country, but I am also not a fan of people staying here illegally either.

    I will bet a months paycheck that the average Japanese citizen has ZERO idea that this many foreigners are staying illegally in Japan now. This just doesn't make the news, and I wonder why? Government doesn't want the bubbles of safe and legal Japan bursting.

  • -7

    sir_bentley28

    But of that number, how many were granted citizenship? That's what I want to know.

  • 5

    NZ2011

    Granted citizenship, well only people who apply would even have a chance and given Japan's single citizenship rules I imagine thats a pretty low number.

  • -7

    thepersoniamnow

    I expect that to double by 2025. Anybody else think so? Mostly Asian workers, less English teachers as the price goes down.

  • 1

    socrateos

    Create more jobs to increase more job shortage. And by so doing, keep pressing for wage hikes as well as urgency to accept more foreign workers.

  • 2

    bruinfan

    Many are now from Vietnam and Nepal. I am happy to see people from various countries.

  • 9

    tinawatanabe

    But of that number, how many were granted citizenship? That's what I want to know.

    People who were granted citizenship are not included in that number. They are counted as Japanese.

  • 6

    Yubaru

    People who were granted citizenship are not included in that number. They are counted as Japanese.

    Lol! Many, like myself, will be counted as "Japanese" but not accepted as being "Japanese" because the average "Japanese" citizen can't get past the idea that "citizenship" and "ethnicity" are two different things......except of course when the foreigner who takes Japanese citizenship plays for a national team!

  • -8

    domtoidi

    Then move.

  • 5

    Yubaru

    Then move

    Why? I am happily married, have three great kids, born and raised here, soon to be a grandfather again, successful at work, decent pay, plenty of time off......no complaints on what matters.

    These kinds of discussions could be had about just about any place in the world. This isnt just Japan that treats foreigners this way, other places do too.

    If you let it bug you, you'll end up eating your self up from the inside.

    Best way to deal with it, turn out the BGM, those who know know, and those who dont, and act all ignorant...f-em!

  • 0

    ironsword

    Yes foreigners in Japan are mostly Asian now. Westerners don't come anymore , at least english teacher types don't, since the pay is so low now. Only those transferred by their companies like me on high salaries would come to Japan.

  • 4

    zichi

    An interesting point would be the big increase in the number of foreigners with the Koreans and Chinese being the largest groups but also a decrease in the overall crime rates. The largest crime committed by foreigners is visa overstays.

    I have lived here for more than two decades and have no regrets with the decision. I will be here for the remaining days.

    I don't have a problem not being "Japanese" and in fact when I go out I mostly look like a tourist which makes it all much easier. Amazing different reactions when I have a camera around my neck. Sometimes confusing because to others I feel and behave like a Japanese.

    I have lived in a tiny village in the Japan Alps and then in Kobe for the past 15 years. I enjoyed good relations from both places. Being an artist and holding exhibitions have given me a life I would not have had with other professions.

  • 6

    gogogo

    Got to agree, salaries in Japan are terrible.

  • 0

    gokai_wo_maneku

    Do the number of Chinese and Korean special permanent residents, descendants of Chinese and Koreans who were brought here during the war but lost their Japanese citizenship after the war but are now in the 4th generation? Are they counted as "foreigners" because they lack Japanese citizenship (although it is now really easy to get it for them)?

  • 1

    inkochi

    2.3 million is an interesting figure - it is about 1.8% of the population of Japan, not a high figure until compared to percentage figures in the recent and not so recent past.

    It is interesting in the sense that policy makers less and less can make assumptions about homogeneity of the nation's population here. Then it waters down more in some areas - say Gumma, Aichi and so on with concentrations of people with cultures from outside (not really in Kochi though).

    For quite a few years they have been discussing demographics in terms of 127 or 128 million people, who for all intents and purposes have been considered 'Japanese'. It would be a bit of a shock if the actual figure for the local 'Japanese' count were below 125.

  • 0

    toshiko

    Burma population increases more according to last evening's Jeopardy q and a.

  • -6

    Peter Usojanai

    Not even close to the numbers of unregistered because they don't wanna pay town tax, state tax, health insurance. The Major flaw in the system is letting the foreigners decide to register or not, it should be mandatory with companies checking to make sure they have registered with fines to companies that don't comply. These un-registered gaijins send Japanese money home by normal post so they don't have to go thru the bank system so not only aren't they paying taxes, they aren't even spending the Japanese yen here. Plus being un-registered means they can skip out of the country after raping and killing someone because the town office has no record of them being here and slows down the search.

  • 1

    Goals0

    In 1991 there were 693,050 special permanent residents (Chinese and Korean), making up 57% of all foreigners.

    In 2016 there were just 338,950, making up 14% of all foreign residents.

    Many have taken Japanese nationality.

  • 4

    zichi

    @Peter Usojanai

    don't know which country you are living in but a 100% dismissal of your comment.

  • 1

    badman

    Do the number of Chinese and Korean special permanent residents, descendants of Chinese and Koreans who were brought here during the war but lost their Japanese citizenship after the war but are now in the 4th generation? Are they counted as "foreigners" because they lack Japanese citizenship (although it is now really easy to get it for them)?

    Yes they are counted as foreigner.

  • -2

    toshiko

    @badman: write source of your iiinfoo. Didn't they become Japanese so that Japan can collect tax from them?

  • 5

    sandiegoluv

    Peter, what country are you in? I mean seriously.... where in the world did you get that information? It sounds like alternative facts. Also try using "foreigners" instead of "gaijin" since WE are speaking English here anyway. And there is no need to hyphenate "unregistered." You should term them "unregistered foreigners." Just all kinds of problems with what you wrote.

  • 1

    albaleo

    @Goals0

    in 1991 there were 693,050 special permanent residents ... In 2016 there were just 338,950 Many have taken Japanese nationality.

    But from that group of special permanent residents, many have probably died just due to age. (Their children may have taken Japanese nationality.)

    My memory is a bit vague on this, but when my daughter was born in 1984 (just prior to the big family law change), I think she was given special permanent residence. It may not have been "special" but she was given a permanent residence status on a simple card with no photo. She obtained Japanese nationality within a few months of birth, and I'd largely forgotten her temporary status at the time. Does anyone else remember that situation?

  • -4

    Peter Usojanai

    @zichi..you saying 100% of foreigners here are registered? please provide proof. I've been here in Japan longer than most of you here. I know the cracks in the system and what "foreigners" can get away with because I work in a circle that is related to foreign employment. Just because your company or English group does it properly doesn't mean you know about the numbers getting in and out undetected.

  • -1

    pacint

    Agree a lot of undocumented foreigners like the ones that are homeless, etc.

    Wonder how AirBnB will affect people that stay longer than their tourist visas.

  • 1

    kohakuebisu

    Close to one quarter of the 2.38 million are in their twenties. Getting on for about 600,000.

    There are 6.6 million Japanese in their twenties, so around 1 in 12 people in this age group in Japan is non-Japanese. I bet that would surprise most people, but that is what the numbers say.

    It's a shame that a large number will be doing migrant-labour type work, which limits the effect they can have on Japanese society.

  • 2

    zichi

    @Peter Usojanai

    Not even close to the numbers of unregistered because they don't wanna pay town tax, state tax, health insurance. The Major flaw in the system is letting the foreigners decide to register or not, it should be mandatory with companies checking to make sure they have registered with fines to companies that don't comply.

    To visit Japan every person is required to hold a current passport from their country of origin and also a visa. All people entering the country pass through immigration where their entry conditions and checked. The immigration authorities know the exact numbers of people entering the country. They also know the exact numbers of people who exit the country so the quoted figures in the post are accurate.

    Unlike Europe or America there are no undocumented people entering the country without passing through immigration.

    Tourist visas are for 90 days and then people are required to register with immigration and the majority of people in that category do that.

    Like stated in the post there are people who violate their visas and stay beyond their period. Being illegal would mean avoiding all contact with authorities including health care.

    There have been some cases of Chinese entering on false passports even when previously deported. The number of cases are low.

    Its illegal for any person or company to employ workers who are illegal and will be fined when discovered. Suggest those companies are also made to pay the costs of deporting them.

    These un-registered gaijins send Japanese money home by normal post so they don't have to go thru the bank system so not only aren't they paying taxes, they aren't even spending the Japanese yen here.

    When living in Nagano I did sometimes see small groups of foreigners working for building companies and so it does happen. Those illegal workers are paid less than the minimum wage so would not be liable for taxes. They would have to spend more on food, clothes and the basic needs of living including rent. Everyone pays sales tax. They are not able to send much of their money home because they earn so little. The exception might be those who are sex workers or bar hostesses. It estimated there are about 5000 foreigners illegally working on farms.

    Plus being un-registered means they can skip out of the country after raping and killing someone because the town office has no record of them being here and slows down the search.

    Again there are no illegals crossing the borders and entering the country and non are able to leave without having the correct original documents. They would be arrested and prosecuted if they tried to leave the country. Your statement is more like hate speech against illegal workers. The town office no longer deals with immigration. The NPA crime figures say the opposite which I said already. Number of foreign residents up and the crime rate is down.

    @zichi..you saying 100% of foreigners here are registered? please provide proof.

    I never said or suggested that and states in the post the numbers of illegal residents and I accept those figures are accurate.

    I've been here in Japan longer than most of you here.

    I too have lived here for nearly 25 years.

    I know the cracks in the system and what "foreigners" can get away with because I work in a circle that is related to foreign employment.

    Then I assume you are doing your civic duty and reporting those companies which employ illegal workers.

    Just because your company or English group does it properly doesn't mean you know about the numbers getting in and out undetected.

    I don't work for any company or individual, I'm an artist.

  • 1

    wtfjapan

    less English teachers as the price goes down. what does that comment even mean!! Not all native English speakers actually teach English.

  • 0

    zurcronium

    Build that wall! Or better yet spread that net. We have got to stop those illegal aliens from swimming to Japan. They are taking jobs away from legal foreigners and besides they never really dry off. A really beautiful net, with a single opening in it for good foreigners to come through. I love the good foreigners, they are terrific. Bad foreigners, just plan sad.

  • 2

    toshiko

    It is nice registered foreigners are increasing. Shortage of workers. No one is stealing jobs. People working is better than robots are bossing workers.

  • 1

    taj

    toshikoMAR. 19, 2017 - 09:16PM JST

    @badman: write source of your iiinfoo. Didn't they become Japanese so that Japan can collect tax from them?

    Toshiko, in case someone hasn't already addressed this question, no. Special foreign resident's were given the option to nationalize. Many younger ones do after their grandparent's die, and many grandparent'ts are dying off. Japan can and does collect taxes from all of us working foreign resident's just as it does working citizens.

  • 5

    sandiegoluv

    @Peter, since YOU are the one who started that conversation in the first place, you should be the one to provide proof. To say that you know what you do, just because you do a certain job, does not mean that we can trust what you say. I have been here for more than 25 years and know that system very well also. Undocumented, means came here in a boat, swam here or came here in a UFO. This is Japan, not the USA. All foreigners are documented and to suggest differently is absurd.

    The Major flaw in the system is letting the foreigners decide to register or not

    No, we foreigners are not given the option of registering or not. All foreigners are required by law to register at their local ward offices upon moving into a certain area. It is the law. We have to. What you might be talking about is foreigners who have overstayed their visas. They are not unregistered. Wording is very important here.

  • 2

    Yubaru

    For the poster(s) who think Japan is overflowing with illegals....(rolling eyes here) Please read the following;

    http://www.immi-moj.go.jp/newimmiact_1/en/

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