Rice shipped from Fukushima Prefecture

Japan Today —

Rice was shipped from Fukushima Prefecture on Monday for the first time since the March 11 disaster. The rice was tested for radiation and got the all-clear, a spokesman for the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries said.

The central government issued guidelines earlier this month that rice would be checked twice for radioactive cesium before and after harvesting in 17 prefectures. The rice shipped on Monday was grown in Koriyama, which is about 60 kilometers from the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Fukushima prefectural officials said they are testing rice in 20 municipalities for contamination.

  • 11

    Nicky Washida

    Not buying it. Figuratively or literally

  • 9

    The758

    The government keeps raising and lowering radiation limit levels, so you'll excuse me if I'm not filled with confidence

  • 9

    smithinjapan

    How much do you want to bet this rice does not get labelled as being from Fukushima? I bet it either: a) simply gets the label 'Nihon-sei' and is shipped abroad or sold dirt-cheap to school lunch companies, or b) it is mixed in with other rice so no one is the wiser, c) or it is ground up with other food and used to feed livestock.

    Either way, we're going to get it in one form or another. It should never have been allowed to be grown, but once again we are seeing the government avoid the real issues in favour of pandering to a number of complaints. They dismiss safety in the hopes it will garner them a few popularity votes with the locals, as well as the fact that if they allow the farmers to sell and ship their rice they avoid paying that much more in compensation. This is sick!

  • 8

    Oracle

    So no caesium 134 or 137? Awesome! How about strontium 90 and cobalt 60? Neptunium 239? Iodine 131?

    Didn't check? DO NOT WANT.

  • 8

    Utrack

    I wonder if the rice will be labeled or will it be mixed with rice from other prefectures so it will sell.

  • 8

    sasukene

    My father-in-law grows rice in Fukushima-ken 60km NW from the nuke plant. Harvest time will be in October and he does not even want to eat his own rice due to fears of radiation! The local JA office told farmers in the area just after the quake not to plant rice this year but then changed their mind and said go ahead and plant they will check it. But my father-in-law is not sure that his rice will be checked or not. No way I will eat the rice if it is ever passed as being okay.

  • 7

    smithinjapan

    Asagao: "let's all go the govt and say "told you so!" then they will be the losers,"

    I realize you're being sarcastic, but all that would happen, literally, is that the government in ten years time would say, "It is regrettable that the government(s) of ten years ago decided to ship the rice/beef/fish (and what not), but that was a different government and a different time. We bear no responsibility." After that they probably WOULD bow and apologize, though. How long did it take them to cop up to Minamata Disease, and how long after that before they admitted fault and offered compensation?

    No sir, you'll never see a dime in ten years time.

  • 7

    Oracle

    Nippon Nation

    I'll be the first one in line buying my bag of Fukushima rice.

    Of course you will! You are always first in line when there is no line!

  • 6

    Asagao

    It does contain radiation, but not exceeding govt levels. It will either be sold as "save Fukushima" charity rice or mixed with other rice.

  • 6

    Neo_Rio

    I'm inclined to recall Japanese history in relation to the mercury poisoning in Minamata.. You'd have to be insane to think that history isn't going to repeat itself this time around.

  • 6

    bentheredonthat

    the rice should be used to prisons in japan and all over the world. consider it an extra incentive for people to not break the law.

  • 6

    BlueWitch

    Strontium accumulates in bones and meat and is more dangerous, especially for children.

    And do you think the our government cares? NO!! They only care about getting fatter and richer, getting expensive meals, cars and whores. The CORRUPTED/ARCHAIC/OUTDATED/ASS-BACKWARD government of japan is the ultimate DISGRACE!!! and I could care less if they try to control and censor this website, they do not own my life or my mouth. I will keep stomping down on them and spreading the truth. The government of Japan is a sewer filled with maggots. They don't care about killing the children as long as they can make extra money out of the irradiated food. They even go as far as to sell such contaminated products to school lunches!!! What does that tell you?!

  • 6

    T_rexmaxytime

    **Sorry but I am not going to eat anything that was grown in Fukushima regardless of what some experts in safety standards claim. To be honest I think it's all bogus and the government is in denial. **

  • 5

    sparkles71

    THIS IS JUST WRONG! I am appalled at the lack of concern for the future health of Japan.

  • 5

    horrified

    It seems there is very little radiation in the rice. While I won't go out of my way to buy it, I won't freak out if I end up eating it at a restaurant or wherever. But -- and this is a big but -- there is no way I will let anyone feed it to my children. Children are more susceptible to DNA damage from internal radiation.

    If we were starving, then of course, I would have no choice to let the kids eat it. That is not the case here. Also, how much mochi and senbei rice is contaminated? How much will children consume? This society should be focussing on the children more. All exported food to many countries must pass inspection, and yet the school board can't afford a machine to test the lunches they feed the children?

  • 4

    tmarie

    All clear my butt!! Why are cameras never around when they do such tests? I won't touch anything from the area if I can help it - but with lies, cover-ups... lord knows.

  • 4

    jforce

    This is a tough one not to say NO to. I'm already in the process of making sure my community schools are not using the products from that area. Hate to panic, but it's better to be safe than sorry. Even up here in inaka, where it's poor, we have to watch the government and make sure they're not allowing products from tohoku into our schools just because the government "deems" it safe. What is more, the apathy from the locals is shocking. Like lemmings.

  • 4

    Philip Boniello

    I do not want any "Godzilla Rice". Wakarimashta? Hai? Domo.

  • 4

    gogogo

    Who tested it? and define "all clear"... "all clear" would indicate there is 100% no radiation at all... highly unlikely.

  • 4

    warnerbro

    Testing a handful of rice in 20 communities is ridiculous. Even assuming the government standard is safe, even assuming the test was conducted appropriately, they are testing only a miniscule fraction. One single paddy field in one community might have near zero contamination at one end and high contamination at the other depending on the topography, weather, etc. Pronouncing rice from wide areas safe is irresponsible and unscientific. Government maps of caesium distribution may be found here http://bit.ly/qImVbY (Released to the public 5 months after the fact.) Have a look and ponder whence our food staples should come.

  • 4

    BlueWitch

    Nippon NationAug. 30, 2011 - 12:49PM JST

    I'll be the first one in line buying my bag of Fukushima rice.

    Hell yeah, Take all the rice bags from Fukushima, including peaches and everything else. I don't want them here at home. You can easily become a TESTER volunteer and get lots of stuff from free, you know? LOL

  • 4

    Cos

    I'm really tired of seeing peaches from Fukushima everywhere in Osaka now. I had never seen one before this Summer, as so many peaches are produced in closer prefectures. I can't tell how many they sell, but there seem to be people buying. That's not even cheaper. So you can't say customers calculate "Hey, I'm 99... or I'm a heavy smoker, so I take Fukushima food to save 500 yen now. " . They really want to do it to "help". And peaches... what an essential food ! We can't skip one season of peaches ? That will be the same for rice. They'll ship some here. Do they count on a % of people that think that helps ? And they are are wrong. That helps the cover up and the lack of responsabilities. We are collectively wrong. We should all have refused to take the Fukushima risk, farmers should have refused to plant, parents refused to say with kids under 16 (and older kids are able to go on their own to study in other prefectures), teachers refused to teach there, school shokudos refused to serve. Waiting that Government tell us to leave, tell us to avoid food is a very bad idea.

  • 4

    T_rexmaxytime

    The only reason people and the government are closing an eye from the true danger of radiation is because of the economic implication it has on the country. It seems that the old ways/idea of pursuing only economic prosperity is over and Japan needs to rethink about what is truely important to the Japanese . We have to do things differently now. We need to put our priorities in order!!!

  • 4

    valley-of-the-shadows

    All this after an article which says the rice is safe!

    If you believe everything you read, don't read.

    Why can't you just accept some hopeful good news for the people of Fukushima?

    Accepting rice grown in a prefecture that has had a tonne of radiation fall on it is like accepting fraud. Nothing hopeful in that at all.

  • 4

    hanataro

    no comment. it does not matter where did the rice shipped. was any radiation or not. its not for consumption. is there anybody who can take responsibility of this? of course nobody. welcome in japan

  • 3

    BlueWitch

    I have to admit I do not buy rice in the local markets, my husband owns a couple rice paddies that he rents to another family and we get 6 rice bags as payment twice a year. But our paddies are way far from those in Fukushima so I guess we should be fine. Still, I fear contaminated rice will reach our children through the school lunches somehow...scary!!

  • 3

    johnnybravo

    More details

    http://www3.nhk.or.jp/daily/english/29_15.html

    I wouldn't touch that rice even with a 30ft pole..

  • 3

    BurakuminDes

    the rice should be used to prisons in japan and all over the world. consider it an extra incentive for people to not break the law.

    I say it should be fed to the likes of TEPCO staff, employees at other Japanese power companies, Japanese politicians of all sides - including Noda - and Japanese civil servants, in particular all workers at the Ministry of Agriculture. Foreign prisoners did not contribute to this disaster - they don't deserve this like these other mobs.

  • 3

    delrennich

    You gotta be kidding me. Rice from Fukushima? Fukushima should be closed off, just like Chernobyl. What kinds of idiots would buy any kind of food from Fukushima? Japanese people have their heads buried in the sand.

  • 3

    valley-of-the-shadows

    This really shows up Japan's complete lack of safety standards in its entirety. It's simply disgraceful they are continuing to ship any items out of Fukushima. It's criminality of the highest order...

  • 3

    TheNickster

    the big problem is that just looking at the labels and making sure it's not from Fukushima won't protect you. I have friends in a trading company, they are Japanese, and for instance with radioactive milk, a lot of them are expecting a mix of 'clean' and radioactive milk to cover up. also, there is a lot of radioactivity outside of Fukushima. The best solution is not to buy ANYTHING that comes out of Japanese soil or Japanese waters. I am not afraid to say that, we live in extreme times, and they require extreme measures. (well not so extreme, just buying foreign food should be doable)

  • 2

    some14some

    Shipped abroad, exported? or shipped to undisclosed local destination? Please check thrice for radioactive cesium and make final destination public.

  • 2

    Maitake

    The evacuation radius recommended by the US was 80km ? The rice is within about 60km of the nuke plant... Somehow, magically, the rice has been deemed radioactively free enough to be safely consumed? I call BULLSHIT.

  • 2

    Spidapig24

    Rice was shipped from Fukushima Prefecture on Monday for the first time since the March 11 disaster. The rice was tested for radiation and got the all-clear, a spokesman for the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries said.

    YEAH RIGHT!!!! Like you can believe these clowns

  • 2

    Foxie

    As long as it is not tested for all the other nuclear ingredients, I won't buy it. Noticed in my supermarket that they are selling rice from Tohoku much cheaper than other prefectures but nobody seems to buy it.

  • 2

    GW

    That nhk link is as useles as this one!

    Hey Noda, publish the DAMNED DATA! This is just so so wrong

  • 2

    genji17

    Atkins diet in Japan just keeps getting easier and easier...

  • 2

    badmigraine

    Also, in ten years' time, it will be difficult to prove anything in the scientific or legal sense. Because there is no comprehensive, systematic or controlled collection of radiation data, and because nobody will have any way of successfully overturning the official judgment that the level was safe. This all happened already at Chernobyl, and again at Three Mile Island. There are no surprises here.Keep that in mind when you read "official" or "expert" statements about the risk of radiation, the number of problems or deaths from Chernobyl, etc.

  • 2

    Weasel

    **Rice shipped from Fukushima Prefecture

    ...only to sit on the shelves of merchants for months on end.

  • 2

    bogva

    Blue Witch, if I am you I will push the lenders of your field check the rice! No magic in this (as somebody implies magically Fukushima rice is non-radioactive). Its physics - there is (or there is some as in the case) or it is not measurable. With current technology even ppm concentrations are measurable. Even the water has lots of elements which just hearing the name everybody will freak out. But it is proven they are not harmful under certain limit - so we drink this water anyway. All Japan have hot-spots. First the green cultures were affected close to Fukushima, cows ate hay, etc. Some places were soaked with rain. Mostly NW and NE (yes up to Hokaido in the Pacific - first hand information from Oceanography research) The levels in the sea are comparable to the pollution in Black sea after Chernobil. I also don't buy Fukushima peaches and cucumbers, will definitely skip the rice. It is pitty though we don't know about other places - Yamagata melon, etc., etc. The laboratories are too busy to measure everything.

  • 2

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    Anybody else smell palms being greased?

  • 2

    BlueWitch

    @Darren Brannan

    I read somewhere that if you have a hair sample it is the best indicator of if and when radiation got into your system and could actually provide the basis for a court case in future years.. But don't quote me on that. I am bald as a coot. So many government agencies have already either blatantly lied or deliberately stalled releasing vital info that their words are wind.

    Hell..It wouldn't hurt at all to take and keep a hair sample of all my family members and place it inside the safe for future purposes just-in-case, you know? Thank You indeed for giving this useful advice. I'm glad I know about it now. Cheers, Darren (^_~)

  • 2

    Elbuda Mexicano

    Every time their is some kind of scare here in Japan, mad cow disease etc..Kim chan over in Pyongyang says something like hey, if you can not eat all them nice Japanese beef, heck, over in North Korea many folk ready to eat anything, but this time, even though they are starving, I am surprised he has not said something like, hey, afraid of radiation etc..from Fukushima, just ship all that rice, vegetables, fish beef on over to North Korea.

  • 2

    melguy

    Growing food in fallout zones is so stupid and shortsighted - better to pay farmers not to grow. But what's worse there appears to be no testing for strontium 90 being done anywhere in Japan. Strontium accumulates in bones and meat and is more dangerous, especially for children.

  • 2

    Pukey2

    Airion:

    You can eat Fukushima products if you wish - that's your perogative. But others have a right to avoid them, despite having them thrusted in our faces everywhere.

  • 2

    Johannes Weber

    Airion, you miss an important point. Rice, vegetables and meat are only labelled for the prefecture (if not called kokusan). It is true that Fukushima prefecture has many places with only moderate radiation levels, but customers cannot check, where their food comes from.

    The J government insists on not carrying out tests for produce from outside of certain areas, even though there are excessive radiation levels. See this documentary report (has Japanese subtitles), if you don't believe it: http://youtu.be/5n_3NK-tsOU.

    Since we cannot check everything for ourselves and the J government is not particularly famous for its competence or for its care for the health of citizens, it is "better safe than sorry".

    And there is basically a guarantee that contaminated foodstuffs are mixed with non-contaminated foodstuffs. It has happened before (after Chernobyl) and European countries are far more safety conscious than Japan in many cases. So it will happen here, too. I think You also see it already with all the blended foodstuffs, kokusan foodstuffs and the fishing catch, which is unloaded in other prefectures.

    Parts of Tohoku are on the track of recovery. But it is more the recovery of someone waking up from a long coma, making ready for half a year of rehab. And in the cases of Fukushima, they need a decontamination before the rehab, since the patient would otherwise harm his fellows.

  • 2

    Gilberto Nino Yanguas Mori

    It seems that a lot of people are paranoid with this news. Being a resident of Fukushima, it really saddened me. I cannot blame anyone for that but I would like to ask you guys, how sure are you that all your intakes are healthy and safe for that matter. Hope that none of you is a heavy smoker.

  • 2

    horrified

    Gilberto -

    It seems that a lot of people are paranoid with this news. Being a resident of Fukushima, it really saddened me. I cannot blame anyone for that but I would like to ask you guys, how sure are you that all your intakes are healthy and safe for that matter. Hope that none of you is a heavy smoker.

    I feel for you -- a resident in an area that has been hit with an industrial accident. However, you and the other residents of that area need to understand that there are consumers who have the right to refuse these products, based upon evidence of past deception on the part of the authorities.

    Smoking is certainly not healthy for anyone. But my 10-year-old daughter doesn't smoke and I don't allow her to be around second hand smoke. So please tell me why I should gamble with her health by feeding her food from an area where there is an ongoing nuclear accident. To support the economy?

  • 1

    herefornow

    Let the buyer beware.

  • 1

    Apsara

    I noticed yesterday they are selling Miyazaki rice at our local supermarket (west Tokyo)- we have stocked up a bit on last year's rice, but I think Miyazaki rice is going to be our staple once what we have runs out.

  • 1

    cactusJack

    This testing data should be published and easily accessible. Not just a "It is safe, folks!"

  • 1

    combinibento

    Note the article does not state the rice was found to have "no radiation." It simply says it got the all clear. So there is most likely some levels of radiation; just not enough enough to convince the government it shouldn't be sold.

  • 1

    badmigraine

    Amazingly, a week or so back, even radiation was found to be "radiation-free". Look at this Reuters article entitled "Rice from town near Tokyo is radiation-free". You read the article, and down near the bottom you find out that "no more than 200 bq/kg" was found in the rice. This level is above the US legal limit, of 170 bq/kg. It's more than 5 times the limit that Ukraine has set. So there you go. "Radiation-free".

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/10/us-japan-nuclear-rice-idUSTRE7791EW20110810

  • 1

    Spidapig24

    Weasel

    **Rice shipped from Fukushima Prefecture ...only to sit on the shelves of merchants for months on end.

    And then be relabelled as coming from someplace else.

  • 1

    John Schellenberg

    hmm.. What is the brand name of this rice called?

  • 1

    Johannes Weber

    There won't be any problem with Fukushima rice in the shops. You put it into all the obento boxes and onigiri that people buy at convenience stores. I've noticed that rice in onigiri seems to be always declared as kokusan. Or do you really believe that Japanese people suddenly start to care about the ingredients of their bento lunches as long as it's "oishisoudesune"?

    @ Bluewitch and bogva: I guess Your fields are probably near Tsukuba? That rice should be completely safe. For radiation to enter vegetables, they have to be either rather longlived with an extended period of exposure or there has to be an awesome fallout, which contaminates the soil beyond redemption (leafy plants can be an exception). In both cases, this would result in a high aerial radiation dose and in contaminated drinking water. Neither is detected in Tsukuba.

    Since Tsukuba is testing a lot (and also has the qualified personel), data is well known here. Imagine "Tsukuba Science City" screwed the tests up. How embarassing...

    Rice from municipalities like Tsukuba, where the local aerial radiation dose is similar to the world average is probably as safe as rice from anywhere in West Japan or from overseas. Interesting though to, I measured two weeks ago that Shiga prefecture has the same aerial radiation dose as Tsukuba in Ibaraki.

  • 1

    TheNickster

    Its a sad thing to say, but the best answer to this farce is: DON'T BUY JAPANESE PRODUCTS. Rice from California, Beef from Australia and the US, vegetables from South America. PS does anyone know about COSTCO in Japan or any Supermarkets that sell import stuff? Does COSTCO sell mainly import food or also Japanese-originated food?

  • 1

    Pukey2

    cos:

    I'm really tired of seeing peaches from Fukushima everywhere in Osaka now. I had never seen one before this Summer, as so many peaches are produced in closer prefectures

    This is what I feel too. Suddenly, this year, there seems to be so many fruit and vegetables from Fukushima. Peaches, cucumbers,etc. It's as if they're forcing us to eat them. Well, I haven't bought anything from that place and I'm trying to avoid stuff grown in Kanto, as much as I can. Japanese rice is not much of a problem - I simply don't like the stuff in the first place.

  • 1

    GW

    Airion,

    Sadly its Japans past problems with labeling, lieing etc that give the govt testing ZERO CREDIBILITY.

    Sadly ALL OF FUKUSHIMA WILL/IS PAYING FOR THAT NOW!

    We have been lied to far too many times to count & how many times didnt we find out we were lied to. Its scary to think about. THAT is why produce & meat etc MUST be pulled period.

    Sadly its just impossible for anyone to believe anything about food being safe from Fukushima, its NOT possible now.

  • 1

    horrified

    Arion- Excellent points. There are double checks on SOME rice. Not ALL rice. Can I have access to the exact batch that was tested? Is there any way for me, as a regular consumer, to see a label somewhere on the rice that tells me that exact farm was one of the ones tested?

  • 1

    zichi

    We live in West Japan but after Mar.11 I told my wife not to buy any food grown or produced east of Osaka. We mostly try and buy locally grown organic food within Hyogo Prefecture. We never buy "mixed rice" which is always lower quality.

  • 1

    melguy

    Let's suppose that the testing was careful and thorough, and so the rice has less than 500 Bq per kilogram.

    1) That doesn't make it radiation free, but that's how it's being described in much of the media coverage.

    2) Personally I'd rather not ingest any radioactive caesium or strontium at all. I don't need internal radiation, for me or for my kids. So it may be "safe" but it's reasonable to want to avoid eating it unless levels are unmeasurable.

  • 1

    Gilberto Nino Yanguas Mori

    Thank you Gilberto, I went to Fukushima for my summer vacation and ate the local produce and drank the water all summer. It saddens me deeply that so many people seem to think that products that are testing to be safe are still dangerous.

    Yes indeed! :(

    Just a warning, everyone might end up contracting an illness from being too paranoid rather than contracting an illness from what you thought to be unsafe. Life is too short to worry of very little details.

  • 1

    Gilberto Nino Yanguas Mori

    I feel for you -- a resident in an area that has been hit with an industrial accident. However, you and the other residents of that area need to understand that there are consumers who have the right to refuse these products, based upon evidence of past deception on the part of the authorities.

    Smoking is certainly not healthy for anyone. But my 10-year-old daughter doesn't smoke and I don't allow her to be around second hand smoke. So please tell me why I should gamble with her health by feeding her food from an area where there is an ongoing nuclear accident. To support the economy?

    As I've said, I can't blame anyone for paranoia. I am not telling you to gamble for your child's health but don't get me wrong. What I am trying to say is what is the difference of consuming products from Fukushima(though tested to be safe for consumption) if you are not sure of the safety standards of other products produce from other places?

    Nevertheless, I can't force you or anyone for that matter to buy Fukushima's produce if you really don't want to.

  • 0

    kurisupisu

    @ Asago - correct. the rice can be contaminated and passed as fit for consumption by the Japanese gov!

    What a nauseating situation!

  • 0

    oberst

    make sake out of it. 1. less salarymen getting drunk after work. 2. salerymen spent quality time with family 3. hopefully more time spend with wife will result in higher birth rate.

    family values................cheers

  • 0

    Darren Brannan

    I read somewhere that if you have a hair sample it is the best indicator of if and when radiation got into your system and could actually provide the basis for a court case in future years.. But don't quote me on that. I am bald as a coot. So many government agencies have already either blatantly lied or deliberately stalled releasing vital info that their words are wind.

  • 0

    melguy

    Here's another point of view on the topic at the Independent.

    Why the Fukushima disaster is worse than Chernobyl

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/why-the-fukushima-disaster-is-worse-than-chernobyl-2345542.html

  • 0

    Airion

    I only mean to point out that just because it's from Fukushima doesn't automatically mean it's radioactive. Many people here seem to think so.

    I completely agree that the lack of tests is a problem and it's something I'm very concerned about. However that is irrelevant to this article. It specifically says the rice was tested twice. I can understand if people nonetheless want to be better safe than sorry and not buy the rice. What bothers me is how people read an article like this and stubbornly insist the rice is dangerous or that there was fraud. I think many people, either because of their views on nuclear power or out of a deep mistrust of the government don't want to (or can't) accept any good news out of Fukushima.

  • 0

    uzneko

    I'm excited to hear this for Fukushima and cannot wait to eat some <3 <3 Gambare!

  • 0

    uzneko

    Thank you Gilberto, I went to Fukushima for my summer vacation and ate the local produce and drank the water all summer. It saddens me deeply that so many people seem to think that products that are testing to be safe are still dangerous.

  • -1

    Nippon Nation

    I'll be the first one in line buying my bag of Fukushima rice.

  • -1

    Apsara

    I say it should be fed to the likes of TEPCO staff

    One of my husband's good friends works in Tepco's IT section. How is he responsible for this situation? Basically he was recruited by the wrong company out of university almost 20 years ago. He has a wife and baby daughter. I really don't understand what people have against your average Tepco worker, they do not deserve this kind of hate.

  • -1

    Airion

    Fukushima is a big prefecture. Some parts of the prefecture are highly contaminated. There are hot spots too. But some areas are fine.

    Yes, it's always possible that there's fraud at work, but where is there any evidence of it here? The government hasn't been shy about halting shipment of goods that have tested positive for high radiation, such as beef. Why would it be different here? The problem has been a lack of testing, and that's what I worry about. In the case of rice though, they've been aggressive about testing.

    No, you don't have to eat it. Everyone can and should make that decision for themselves.

  • -1

    oginome

    Maybe this will encourage the Japanese to try out some different kinds of rice instead.

  • -2

    Tahoochi

    BlueWitchAug. 30, 2011 - 08:54PM JST

    They only care about getting fatter and richer, getting expensive meals, cars and whores.

    That pretty much speaks for politicians around the world.

    The CORRUPTED/ARCHAIC/OUTDATED/ASS-BACKWARD government of japan is the ultimate DISGRACE!!! ...The government of Japan is a sewer filled with maggots.... I will keep stomping down on them and spreading the truth.

    You're probably right, but is it really necessary to say all that here? I would always be more willing to hear what you have to say, BlueWitch, if you said it with a little less.... name-calling...... and some facts might help.

  • -3

    Asagao

    Maybe we are all being too negative. Let's all eat the rice, and the fish and veggies and beef, and then when we get cancer in ten years time, let's all go the govt and say "told you so!" then they will be the losers, all we will have is a bit of cancer, they will have to bow low and appoligise!!!

  • -5

    Airion

    The comments here are simply amazing. All this after an article which says the rice is safe! Did you read the article? Whether you like it or not, Tohoku, Fukushima included, is recovering. Why can't you just accept some hopeful good news for the people of Fukushima?

  • -7

    Airion

    Evidently there's no point in testing it for radiation. No matter the result, people here won't believe it.

    I would be happy to eat the rice. We need to do what we can to support the people of Fukushima. If farmers can't make a living because people won't buy their products even when it's tested and deemed save, it's just one more tragedy to befall them.

  • -11

    j4p4nFTW

    This rice is perfectly safe. Japanese food is healthy, safe and delicious! If it passed the government's tests then there is no reason to doubt its safety.

Login to leave a comment

OR
Undergraduate: Information session (April 9)

Undergraduate: Information session (April 9)

Temple University, Japan CampusContinuing Education / MBA

Trip to Bountiful in the Heart of Tohoku

Trip to Bountiful in the Heart of Tohoku

JI Core 50 Professional MonitorsBusiness Services

Blowfish Cuisine in Japan

Blowfish Cuisine in Japan

Ms GreenTravel / Hotels

Special Offers

グローバルに
活躍したいあなたへ
外資系転職

バイリンガル人材の
ための求人サイト

見てみる

More in National

View all

View all

Time
to Buy
in Japan

Find the perfect home today!

Search