TEPCO starts diverting Fukushima groundwater to sea

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  • 6

    Disillusioned

    On Wednesday, engineers started releasing that water after it satisfied quality tests more rigorous than those put in place by the Japanese government or by the United Nations, TEPCO said in a statement.

    After all the lies and concealing of incidents are we supposed to believe this? They are regulating themselves! Unbelievable!

  • 2

    Cricky

    Got to take your hat off to TEPCO, trust and confidence with total government approval...

  • 0

    M3M3M3

    People in Japan have been ridiculing me for years just because I don't eat fish... oh how the tables have turned.

  • 3

    JA_Cruise

    TEPCO can never be in a winning position and are overwhelmed at the huge task of trying to uncontaminate the radiated water... but the fact is, there is just no more room for storage and must be released. They should not allow any local fisherman in the area.

  • -1

    M3M3M3

    They should not allow any local fisherman in the area.

    When you say 'the area' you must mean the pacific ocean right?

    but the fact is, there is just no more room for storage and must be released.

    Or is there is just not enough willingness by TEPCO to spend more money to buy more land and bigger tanks for storage?

  • 0

    HowardStern

    but the fact is, there is just no more room for storage and must be released.

    Please open your mind beyond the politically motivated news stories you are clearly engulfed in. Your government and in turn your media are deceiving you.

  • -2

    gaijinfo

    Dead ocean. Dead planet. The Vesuvius of the modern world.

  • 5

    zichi

    The groundwater which runs off the nearby mountains to the Fukushima atomic plant has always run down and out to sea but it goes under the plant, some leaking into the reactor basements and becoming highly contaminated from the reactor cooling water which is also leaking into the basements from cracks in the reactor containment vessels. Some of that water escapes and ends up in the ocean.

    Its the right decision of TEPCO to try and divert the mountain groundwater before it reaches the atomic plant.

  • -2

    Magnet

    Isn't that what they've been doing this whole time anyway?

  • -1

    Disillusioned

    Yes, it is the right decision to divert the natural run off and it should have been done years ago as a priority rather than an afterthought. However, next month will be the rainy season and the rainwater will flood the basement, again, and highly irradiated water run off into the ocean, again!

  • -2

    B.B.Q.Demon

    TEPCO's handling of things is either completely lame, due to penny pinching, or way past due, again due to penny pinching. That and and in a dose of severe incompetence and Bob's your uncle.

  • 2

    garymalmgren

    Dear Disillusioned san

    Re, However, next month will be the rainy season and the rainwater will flood the basement, again, and highly irradiated water run off into the ocean, again!

    The whole object of this latest engineering effort is to reduced the amount of underground water running under or entering the damaged reactor buildings. If they " are able to reduce by up to 80 tons per day" from the "300-400 tons of groundwater (becomes) contaminated beneath the site each day". It is a 20% reduction of contaminated water and that is good, don't you think?

  • -2

    Skeeter27

    Something that we all need to remember is that TEPCO would not be doing this without the Japanese goverment approval !!! So, the headlines should read, "Japanese goverment gives the "OK" to dump contaminated radiated water into ocean!!!"

    After all the Japanese government government does control the majority stock of TEPCO !

  • 2

    Star-viking

    Zichi, good point

    Its the right decision of TEPCO to try and divert the mountain groundwater before it reaches the atomic plant.

    However, if Heda or I had made it... Thumbs down all around.

    Modern discourse...meh.

  • 0

    Farmboy

    Its the right decision of TEPCO to try and divert the mountain groundwater before it reaches the atomic plant.

    It's the wrong decision to have the monitoring of the radiation level of that groundwater in TEPCO's hands.

  • 0

    Paul Richards

    It is becoming clear that TEPCO is failing. ****TEPCO engineering expertise has always been in maintenance of a nuclear energy facility. The long term work is for the experts and this already has ramifications due to radionuclide contamination internationally.
    Why can't the Japanese Government invite international nuclear experts and personnel in on a partnership?

  • -1

    Rick Kisa

    What surprises me is how people think that by TEPCO releasing irradiated water in the ocean, it only affects Japanese fishermen!!! The whole world (land, water and sea) is affected. Japan rubbish was found around American cost a few days after the accident, and this must be the very irradiated water that took it there! The pressure to do right things about this mess should come from world pressure bodies such as greenpeace and other countries that should impose compensation package to TEPCO and japan for messing up the planet with no remorse. And never think the IAEA will improve things as it is formed to promote and its head does not seem enthusiastic to do anything...

  • 1

    zichi

    What surprises me is how people think that by TEPCO releasing irradiated water in the ocean, it only affects Japanese fishermen...........

    Except TEPCO aren't releasing irradiated water? It's diverting groundwater from the mountains before it reaches the atomic plant where it does become irradiated and then at least some of it leaks into the ocean.

  • 1

    Star-viking

    OK, I have some solid information on Thyroid Cancer rates in Japan by age group, and age group information for Fukushima.

    Zichi,

    The age group 10-14 year olds is the group with the highest risk of thyroid cancer, and female have a greater risk than males. Tracking down figures is always difficult but the following link provides further figures.

    From the paper "Cancer Incidence and Incidence Rates in Japan in 2005", we get that the age range 55-59 is that with the highest number of new thyroid cancers for men and women. However, if you're talking about 'at risk from I-131', I'd agree with you.

    The paper gives the following age-specific incidence rates per 100,000 per year for males and females:

    0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34

    Male 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.4 1.6 Female 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.7 3.1 4.9 5.8

    Now in 2010, Fukushima Prefecture had:

    82,000 0-4s; 92,000 5-9s; 102,000 10-14s; and 101,000 15-19s in 2010 (Info from Statistics Japan)

    Notice how many more cases females get! It's a big disease for women. If you divide in half you get a rough male-female ratio. Now we know the new scanners are much more accurate than the normal method of just seeing the doctor about a lump - so let's take each age range before 20, and see how many cases we see if we assume the scanners pick up slow-growing cancers that would have appeared over the next 3 age groups. This means for 0-4 Males we would apply 0.5 (0.0 + 0.0 + 0.0 + 0.5), Females we would apply 0.8 (0.0 + 0.0 + 0.1 + 0.7).

    Once you do this for all the Males and Females 0 to 19, you find the expected number of cancers to be 18.59 (Yup, I know there's no such thing as 0.59 of a cancer, but we're looking for ballpark figures here). Now, that's how many we might expect to see per year with the scanner, but it's been 3.2 years since the disaster. If you multiply by 3.2, you get an expected 59.5 cancers.

    Now this is just a rough calculation - but this seems to match the reports pretty well.

  • 1

    zichi

    Star-viking

    Thank you but I think you posted your comment on the wrong post and sadly there's no edit button to delete. I stated that 10-14 year olds in children 0-18 were at the highest risk and females greater than males. I think even with your rough figures indicates that level of cases are higher than in other parts of the country?

    • Moderator

      All readers back on topic please. The topic is diverting groundwater.

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