M3M3M3's past comments

  • 2

    M3M3M3

    Well that was quick. I wonder if the secret letter of assurance that the UK gave to Nissan is now at odds with the hard Brexit that Theresa May is promising to deliver. Considering that something like 80% of production at the Sunderland plant is exported into the EU it makes sense to slowly start relocating.

    Posted in: Nissan to review UK investment stance once Brexit terms clear

  • 0

    M3M3M3

    Economically oil prices critical to Scotland's future prosperity are not a bleak as predicted.

    This is certainly interesting. The oil price will surely determine the timing of any future referendum. But it will be interesting to see if Westminster will even allow it. We seem to be living in a new political age post-Brexit.

    Posted in: Scotland will vote for independence in two years: Salmond

  • 1

    M3M3M3

    Good luck to Scotland. If there's one thing the EU referendum has taught us it's that people value their sovereignty over economic risks. They don't want the agenda to be set by a Parliament in a foreign nation or to be under the yoke of a foreign supreme court. They want to retake their seat at the UN, Nato, amd WTO in order to have more influence internationally. They want to take back control so they can trade with the rest of the world rather than being tied into a customs union with England, which is only concerned with protecting it's own domestic industries in trade deals. And even though Scotland may be leaving Britain, Scotland will not be leaving the British Isles. They will seek the closest possible relationship. (Am I missing any other Brexit arguments that apply perfectly to Scottish independence?)

    Posted in: Scotland will vote for independence in two years: Salmond

  • 6

    M3M3M3

    For the 2020 games, will Japan stop printing maps that show the Northern Territories or Senkaku Islands as part of Japan? Presumably anything less would be unacceptable and against the spirit of the international competition. The hypocrisy is tiring.

    Posted in: Japan says mention of disputed islands on Korean Olympics site 'unacceptable'

  • 1

    M3M3M3

    Trump is only half of the problem. The other half is the American presidency itself. It's always carried the risk of becoming a winner take all elected dictatorship. Americans will reflexively tell you that they overthrew the 'tyrant' King George in the revolutionary war, but what they rarely reflect on is the fact that they replaced him with a President who has powers that King George could never even dream of (such as appointing unelected friends to the cabinet, vetoing legislation passed by a simple majority, ruling by executive orders, etc). I think America is doomed to gridlock and decline unless they amend the constitution and turn the presidency into a more ceremonial position in peacetime.

    Posted in: Promises, pomp and protests as Trump sworn in

  • 0

    M3M3M3

    Needless to say there is nothing traditional about the Diet itself. It's an entirely modern institution. Every Diet member was wearing a western style suit at the first sitting on Nov 29 1890. I hope that irony isn't lost on people.

    Posted in: Dressed for business

  • 5

    M3M3M3

    “Japanese people’s internal organs absorb more fat than the internal organs of Europeans or Americans,” she explains.

    People are right to dismiss the idea that this is unique to Japanese people, but this is a real thing that does actually affect Asian people since there are real genetic difference in fat distribution between Asians and most other races.

    To explain it very simply, as children (of every race) the fat cells in our bodies are generally evenly distributed. This is why whenever you see a fat child they have a fat face, fat fingers, fat arms, fat legs etc. But once most people hit puberty, additional fat cells develop in concentrated areas such as the hips, buttocks and stomach. This is why we can see European adults with a massive beer belly but a normal looking thin face. However, this additional concentration of fat cells after puberty is far less pronounced in Asian people and they maintain an even distribution into adulthood. That's why most sumo wrestlers (and Kim Jong-Un) tend to look like big babies. The idea here is that this more even distribution of fat might lead the organs to become fatter than they would if Asian people also had larger concentrations of fat like other races.

    Studies have been done on this (and the Asian subjects just happened to be Japanese rather than Chinese):

    The DXA and MRI scans of the 30 white and 30 Japanese women, published in 2011, showed much more trunk fat and percentage of abdominal visceral fat in the Japanese than in the white women. Japanese women had higher trunk-to-peripheral-fat ratios and a greater percentage of liver fat and were twice as likely to have fatty livers as whites, the data showed

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/779072

    As with most Nihonjinron myths they are usually based on a grain of truth about Asian people generally, but then twisted to make it seem like it only applies to the Japanese.

    Posted in: Health diets from overseas flooding Japan, but are they right for Japanese bodies?

  • 2

    M3M3M3

    Your stance here is that people can say whatever they want if it cannot be disclaimed, where my stance is that people should not say things if they cannot be supported.

    Yes, I think that sums up our positions very accurately. My view is just that people shouldn't be chastised or discouraged from airing their sincerely held views simply because they can't link to statistical evidence to back them up. Obviously, everyone is free to register their disagreement or provide contrary evidence if it exists. I think that's what the discussion here on JT is all about.

    Article Unavailable

  • 6

    M3M3M3

    The clarity will be appreciated by the markets, but it's interesting how the goal posts keep moving. It's not an encouraging sign. First we heard 'The German car makers are so dependant on the UK market that they will let Britain remain part of the single market while suspending free movement'. Now Theresa says 'The Germans are so dependant on us that they will surely give us a great trade deal after we leave'. Next we will hear, 'The Germans are so dependant on us that tariffs on UK cars will probably only be 8% rather than the full 10% allowed under WTO rules'.

    There were a number of disturbing things in her speech. Here are a few that stuck out for me:

    President Elect Trump has said Britain is not “at the back of the queue” for a trade deal with the United States, the world's biggest economy, but front of the line.

    To come out an actually repeat this was amazing. The UK is officially doubling down on Trump and the special relationship.

    And it will, I know, be debated and discussed at length. That is only right. But those who urge us to reveal more ... will not be acting in the national interest.

    Because this is not a game or a time for opposition for opposition's sake. It is a crucial and sensitive negotiation that will define the interests and the success of our country for many years to come. And it is vital that we maintain our discipline.

    That is why I have said before – and will continue to say – that every stray word and every hyped up media report is going to make it harder for us to get the right deal for Britain. Our opposite numbers in the European Commission know it, which is why they are keeping their discipline. And the ministers in this Government know it too, which is why we will also maintain ours.

    So however frustrating some people find it, the Government will not be pressured into saying more than I believe it is in our national interest to say.

    Wow. Dissent will not be tolerated. We are at war and democratic debate has been suspended until further notice.

    The losers have the responsibility to respect the legitimacy of the outcome. And the country comes together.

    It was amazing to hear the Prime Minister actually refer to people who participated in the advisory referendum, as they were asked to do, as 'losers'. There were no winners or losers and the fact that such incendiary language can make it into a speech like this without anyone objecting to its inclusion really shows you the type of people Theresa has surrounded herself with.

    Posted in: British PM May outlines Brexit course

  • 1

    M3M3M3

    @Strangerland

    When I do make assertions, I make sure that I can support whatever it is I'm asserting

    Sorry for my late reply. I guess this brings me back to my point that child abuse is something that can't be supported by stats. To demand stats is to assert that stats actually exist, which could be very misleading in itself. It basically discredits people's observations when there is no compelling evidence to doubt them. Personally, it's a fact that I've witnessed much more low level child abuse here in Japan than I ever did in my home country. I don't make any wider statistical assumptions based on my own experience, but if many people are allowed to make the same observations here on JT, it could suggest a trend.

    This also reminds me of that famous quote about using stats like a drunk uses a lamp post; for support rather than illumination. Even if stats were provided, I'm sure you could find a way to poke holes in them.

    Article Unavailable

  • 2

    M3M3M3

    Two or three years ago here in Yokohama we used to be able to rent these cars and drop them off at various points in the city. The car is definitely fun to drive, especially the acceleration in such a light electric vehicle.

    Unfortunately, they weren't very popular and the program wasn't renewed. It should have been aimed at tourists but the problem was that in order to sign up you had to schedule an appointment at the Nissan headquarters to receive a training course and then wait to get a membership card in the mail. Basically alot of red tape.

    Posted in: Drive me

  • 2

    M3M3M3

    @Strangerland

    I haven't had even a single instance of this in the people around me. So it makes me doubt that it's a 'very common' issue. However, I'm not going to base my final judgement on my feelings of doubt, I'm going to base my judgement on whether or not it actually is common.

    I suppose my point is rather nuanced and it's more about how you said it rather than what you said. There's a small but significant difference between someone saying "I disagree with you based on my own personal experience and my innate skepticism" and saying "You may be right or you may be wrong, but your contribution is currently worthless unless you provide statistics to back it up". The later is just unnecessarily confrontational and dismissive. It's especially snide and unproductive if you aren't even willing to look up the data for yourself and discover that the data you are demanding doesn't actually exist. Of course, you didn't say it in those exact words but I thought this was implict in your first comment. I understand that you come to JT to do battle (and we have had some good debates) but this is not the most civil and productive way to debate people in good faith. Especially people who are new to the site and might be more easily scared away.

    Johny made that exact claim:

    I disagree. This was the second claim about Japanese men being more fragile than men in other countries, which I also think is a very dubious, but it's certainly not a direct claim that step-parent child abuse happens in Japan more than other countries, is it? I think you are making a leap that, to be fair, Johny didn't explicitly make. If people later extrapolate these claims and stories to assume that it happens more in Japan than anywhere else, I would be the first person to agree with you that they are probably wrong, but I don't think people are jumping to that conclusion.

    @peterl

    No, it's not safe to assume that it happens to a greater extent in the US, because there is a lack of reliable data. But it's not outlandish or unreasonable to claim that it is 'very common' in America, because this is entirely subjective language. Logically, there is probably at least one country that has a lower rate of child abuse than Japan and one with a higher rate. The words 'very common in Japan' are so subjective that they are entirely unfalsifiable unless the number is zero. We shouldn't jump on people who use subjective language in the same way that we would if they used objective language like 'more than' or 'most' etc.

    @Educator60

    Sorry, I didn't intend to say you might be biased. That point was directed to Strangerland.

    Article Unavailable

  • 3

    M3M3M3

    @Strangerland (& @Educator60)

    First, the limited stats on child abuse in Japan which do exist are quite clear, they are at record levels. A cursory google search provides dozens of sources. I feel like your bias in rejecting any negative news about Japan might be just as strong as people who want to paint Japan in a negative light.

    http://www.asahi.com/sp/ajw/articles/AJ201608040045.html

    Secondly, the proposition that children are at greater risk of abuse from stepparents is so well established that it has a name: The Cinderella effect

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinderella_effect

    When you take these two pieces of information, there is nothing baseless, extraordinary or unbelievable about Johny Shaftman's original assertion. You may take issue with the words 'very common', but presumably it's enough to say even 10 or 20 cases is far too many.

    but when the claim is that it happens 'more than in other countries', the opinion is not backed up by reality.

    But nobody made a claim even remotely close to this did they? Nobody said it was more common in Japan than other countries, just that it was 'very common'.

    Again, my concern is just that we don't shout people down by yelling 'prove it!‘ everytime they present an opinion which they genuinely believe to be fact. That's what my 7 year old nephew does. Instead let's help people by telling them why their information may be wrong rather than just announcing that we won't believe anything they say until they provide statistics which may or may not exist. I understand that your agenda might be to stop inaccurate negative information about Japan from ever being posted in the first place, but Japan Today promotes itself as 'News and Discussion', not 'News and Links to Peer Reviewed Journal Articles'.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    M3M3M3

    The European Commission is wrong on this. I support data localisation not only because of privacy concerns but also because it forces companies like Google, Facebook, Amazon etc to set up local data centres in Europe. This makes it more difficult for them to completely weasel out of paying tax or ignoring court rulings by claiming to be based entirely offshore.

    Posted in: EU aims for data transfer deal with Japan, South Korea

  • 3

    M3M3M3

    @Johny Shaftman

    I think statistics are important of course, but there are certain issues (such as child abuse) where reliable statistics simply do not exist. To demand them betrays a fundamental misunderstanding of the nature of child abuse. If some data does exist, the countries with the highest recorded abuse rates are undoubtedly going to be those where teachers and doctors are the least hesitant to report suspected abuse to authorities (most likely America or another western country). Of course, this tells you very little about the prevalence of actual abuse in any given society.

    Article Unavailable

  • 7

    M3M3M3

    @Strangerland

    I'm willing to accept that you may very well be correct. But before I come on board with your claim, I'd like to see how you came to it in the first place.

    You must have some numbers qualify this statement, right?

    Can I ask you a favour? Can you please stop doing this every time you disagree with someone? You've done this a number of times and it just ends up shutting down the converstation and turning the thread toxic. The comments are a place where people come to share their opinions and experiences, not a place where everyone is expected to write a fully footnoted essay. Your demands just end up intimidating people who want to share their thoughts but don't have the time to link to data or statistics. If you doubt someone's claim, just say you disagree or use the dislike button. If you have evidence that contradicts a claim, then by all means post it. But don't go around demanding data when you aren't even willing to look it up yourself. It's not a very constructive discussion is it? If it helps, just assume that every comment begins with 'This is only my opinion and I may be wrong, but..'

    Sorry to call you out on this but I think most people come to the comments to read a diversity of opinion and we don't want new members like Johny Shaftman to be discouraged from ever posting anything again.

    Article Unavailable

  • -1

    M3M3M3

    @JeffLee

    I thought as much. The Remainers are doing a lot of "assuming" these days in the guise of "facts" The problem is that nearly all their past assumptions have been wrong.

    It seems like you are doing alot more assuming here than I am JeffLee. It's a fact that the UK will no longer be entitled to share EU refugee databases once they leave the EU. Do you dispute this? You are the one assuming a radical change in the law will be passed and the UK will somehow be granted access, I am simply assuming the law will be followed and they won't. But as I mentioned above, it will make no difference.

    Posted in: A messy march of folly to Brexit - and beyond

  • 0

    M3M3M3

    I've always loved reading these tablets, sort of like a voyeur peeping into the lives of strangers.

    Posted in: Make a wish

  • 12

    M3M3M3

    I think one of the challenges with becoming successful (if I can call it that) is that fewer and fewer people around you are willing to say 'no' to your bad ideas or provide the constructive criticism that led to your initial success. How anybody could have thought this new song was good enough to release is beyond comprehension. At least pineapple pen was catchy.

    Posted in: 'I Like Orange Juice!' Piko Taro releases new single

  • -1

    M3M3M3

    @JeffLee

    How do you know that? Security and intelligence agencies of a wide variety of countries routinely share info, regardless of political or economic agreements.

    I'm assuming this based on a.) the privacy laws surrounding refugee information are already extremely strict even within the EU and there isn't going to be much support for amending them just to benefit a former EU member, and b.) because there would be no logical reason for the UK to require access.

    What possible benefit would either the EU or the UK gain from sharing or having access? Even if the Eurodac database showed that an asylum seeker had filed asylum applications in every single EU member state before arriving in the UK, so what? The UK will have absolutely no legal right to deport them to the EU if the Dublin regulations no longer apply. The UK might as well just assume that everyone is already in the EU database since it will make no difference if they actually are or aren't. Brexit really means Brexit.

    Posted in: A messy march of folly to Brexit - and beyond

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