Sensato's past comments

  • 0

    Sensato

    I have two passwords for everything. One personal related and one work related.

    @gokai, etc.

    If your private/professional computer use requires passwords on many sites and portals, it is impossible to use one or two passwords for everything.

    For one, some portals that I have to use require that I change my password every so often. That's a big pain because I sometimes type in a no longer valid password, only to have to dig through my records to find the most current one.

    Also, different portals/sites have different requirements. Some require special characters, some disallow them; some require a mix of capital/lowercase, others single case only; some require over a certain number of characters in length, others a limited number; and the list goes on.

    I have many dozens of passwords that I use no less than several times a year. I make note of all of my passwords as soon as they are created or updated. The notes are "encrypted" to make it more difficult for a potential hacker to use them if found.

    Posted in: How do you remember all the passwords and user IDs you use in your daily life?

  • 3

    Sensato

    Peter Barakan has long been my hands-down favorite Japanese celebrity. I first became aware of him in the late 1980s when he hosted the Japan broadcast of the American investigative journalism program 60 Minutes. He would give his take on the various segments after they aired, and put the stories into perspective to make it easier for the Japanese audience to relate.

    He has continually and consistently conveyed his intelligence and maintained his dignity during his many years on Japan's small screen. That is no small feat in a Japanese "tarento" environment where producers egregiously set themselves to the task of othering the non-Japanese they portray on film.

    Posted in: Music stalwart Peter Barakan looks back on his illustrious career

  • 4

    Sensato

    Add in the respect Japan usually shows for senior citizens

    This is yet another one of those longstanding and often repeated positive stereotypes of Japan that does not pan out in reality — Japan is the country of Obasute Yama (姨捨山, "dispose of granny mountain") for heaven's sake. Having lived here for many years, I find that in some instances this may be true, but in many other instances the reality is quite the opposite. I also find that there are many countries where elderly citizens are shown much more respect and kindness than in Japan.

    Anyway, this 高齢運転者 terrible driver gaffe has been all over the Japanese press and Twittersphere, and is even popping up in the news overseas. I wouldn't want to be the "translator" who is credited with this work. My guess is that it was a disgruntled employee who thought nobody would notice.

    Posted in: Kyoto accidentally calls all old people 'terrible drivers'

  • 0

    Sensato

    That's why Atsugiri Jason, or whatever his name is, was so successful.

    @smithinjapan

    Good example. Obviously Micaela's producers were looking for a much more overblown performance that fits their image of what all foreigners are supposed to act like.

    The producers obviously seek something more along the lines of Atsugiri Jason, who plays the over-the-top gesticulating foreigner stereotype to great fanfare: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u44nj0ckVRc

    Posted in: Canadian YouTuber explains why she quit working on Japanese TV

  • 6

    Sensato

    When it comes to "exotic" non-Japanese celebrities and aspiring TV talent in particular, the Japanese TV industry is run with a hostess club mentality. The same applies to AKB47-type girl groups; and yes, often even to English conversation teachers to a large degree.

    Micaela’s example of being told to act like she was awed by the convenience store bentos was one good example — titillating the audience by catering to their preconceived notions about what foreigners ought to find impressive about Japanese culture. Its a continually repeated worn out script, but it never seems to get old, particularly among Japan's older generation.

    Also, I always have to laugh at how they parade famous foreign celebrities visiting Japan out in carbon copy press conferences, and at the voices used in dubbed foreign movies. The Japanese voices of the female characters are invariably high-pitched and excessively "girly" while those of the male characters are at the opposite extreme, gruff and excessively "manly." Very few are portrayed with what I would consider to be a normal sounding Japanese voice, and most often the voices they use don't match the character.

    Posted in: Canadian YouTuber explains why she quit working on Japanese TV

  • 0

    Sensato

    Generally mystery meat is something to be avoided, unless you’re talking about Cup Noodle brand mystery meat.

    Still, something to be avoided.

    Posted in: Cup Noodle Mystery Meat Festival sales suspended due to overwhelming demand

  • 0

    Sensato

    Single mothers, who make on average 150,000 yen a month, get limited support from welfare programs.

    Why just single mother? Don't single fathers under similar circumstances also get support from these welfare programs?

    Posted in: 'Children's cafeterias' combat poverty, neglect in Japan

  • 2

    Sensato

    Now if only the banks would offer me a negative rate on my mortgage...

    Posted in: Abe adviser says benefits of BOJ's negative rates 'very big'

  • 0

    Sensato

    The commercial here was well done. What an intriguing concept, but somewhat creepy at the same time.

    We will be seeing many more clever applications for Pokemon Go-style augmented reality in real geographic space over the coming decade.

    Posted in: Better than a Ouija board: Spot Message helps you communicate beyond the veil

  • 15

    Sensato

    Plus, he is in his 50's so perhaps he needs to relieve himself frequently so he didn't want to let the control center know. ("What?! You need to go again?!?")

    @DebTok

    That or something along those lines seems very likely.

    The company said drivers are supposed to inform the control center in advance that they need to go to the toilet.

    Sure, JR has a policy in place for public consumption, but I the driver doubtlessly knew that if he were to follow those procedures he would be guilt-tripped and put under heaps of pressure. He would surely be told it was his fault for drinking too much liquid before starting his shift.

    I have seen this happen in Japan on very many occasions with respect to illness, where a person is unable to participate in an event after getting sick, and then are later chastised for having allowed themselves to fall ill because ostensibly they hadn't gargled sufficiently or taken other health precautions.

    The witness reported the incident to station officials.

    I hope this "concerned" citizen feels horrible about causing what effectively amounts to a demotion for this driver, who probably has a family to support and other life pressures.

    Posted in: JR East driver reprimanded for urinating from train at station

  • 3

    Sensato

    It looks like the "hands-on" e-mote (Emotional Motion Technology) girlfriend gizmo is now on the blink (for whatever reason). Somebody has attached an "out of order" sign to it: https://goo.gl/e0E4hG

    The Tokyo Game Show organizers might want to brace themselves for a deluge of deeply disappointed fanboys. Not a pretty sight.

    Posted in: Tokyo gamers slapped down for virtual groping

  • 6

    Sensato

    Only in Japan (eye roll).

    At least these people who are excited that it will be "possible to fall in love with a virtual girl," are much less likely to reproduce. Natural selection for the 21st century.

    The photo accompanying this article is tame. Another photo posted online has a guy doing some serious groping: https://goo.gl/Jyzuln

    Posted in: Tokyo gamers slapped down for virtual groping

  • 4

    Sensato

    A recent poll of 154 high school girls, though, showed a change in attitudes. 37.7 percent said they wore a knee-length skirt

    I had to laugh at this "new" trend. Little do these girls know that the last time wearing skirts longer than regulation was popular was when their grandmothers were schoolgirls — and yes, in their lifestyle guidance "seikatsu shido" (生活指導) crusades the stricter private schools in Japan clamp down on non-regulation-length skirts, whether absurdly short or too long.

    In the 1970's, the rebellious types known as "sukeban" (スケバン) modified their skirts to ankle length.

    Here is a Wikipedia entry on sukeban: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sukeban

    Here is what the style looked like: https://goo.gl/NrKZlx

    Here is a comparative look at the "kogyaru," regulation issue, and sukeban styles: https://goo.gl/xg6pxr

    Posted in: No more miniskirts? Changes happening in Japanese schoolgirl uniform fashion trends

  • 1

    Sensato

    "Japanese law requires dual citizens to choose a nationality by age 22. While Japan cannot order other sovereign countries to revoke the citizenship of a Japanese national, the law requires those who have chosen the Japanese citizenship to “make an effort” to give up their other nationality through the procedures of the other country."

    I have heard second-hand of cases where a twenty-something dual citizen is told by immigration officials that they must choose between their two citizenships. If they answer 'Japan,' there is nothing Japanese immigration can do but tell you to begin procedures to give up your other citizenship. However, if your answer is the second country they can take your Japanese passport, and you relinquish your Japanese citizenship right there on the spot.

    The above is all hearsay on my part, but when my children reach that age I want to make sure that they maintain their dual citizenship.

    Article Unavailable

  • 3

    Sensato

    Women in the workplace face the glass ceiling in Japan and to differing degrees everywhere else in the world, but on the flip-side men certainly face a glass ceiling of their own in terms of having practically no option of choosing a life as a homemaker. This is particularly true in Japan, but applies in other countries as well.

    Try being a stay-at-home dad whose wife is the breadwinner. Sure, you might be praised by some, particularly by those who agree with Oprah's opinion that "moms have the toughest job in the world." But more often than not you are seen as lacking masculinity, while being met with scorn and mockery by those who see a man freeloading off of his wife as you take your child to the park on a weekday, attend PTA meetings or take on in other childcare responsibilities.

    As a man in a dual career household, try telling your boss that you suddenly and immediately need to take time off after getting a call from daycare telling you that your child has fallen ill. In my experience in Japan, they look at you as if you'd just flown in from another planet. Not receptive to say the least.

    Posted in: Unlike other advanced nations, if you quit your job in Japan it’s hard to resume your career. In a society where it is difficult for men to be proud that they are homemakers, I don’t imagine the number will increase much more.

  • 17

    Sensato

    I certainly get it. Having seen my fair share of "inspirational" Japanese documentaries and variety show segments scripted to get a tear-jerk reaction at the expense of people with disabilities, I can see why many dislike the genre. Often, "inspirational" seems to be a euphemism for patronizing.

    I find there to be a very high tolerance for patronizing remarks and behavior in Japan. It's definitely cultural. As just one example, consider the praise so often heaped on just-off-the-boat foreigners in Japan when they utter the simplest of Japanese phrases — looks of utter delight and feigned astonishment peppered with plenty of "jozu-jozu" praise, also known as "the talking dog syndrome."

    I realize these sorts of patronizing remarks are said with the best of intentions, but after the umpteenth time the person on the receiving end starts to feel belittled. This is obviously the same way those with disabilities react to these feel-good inspirational documentaries — patronized and belittled.

    Posted in: Poll shows most disabled people in Japan dislike 'inspirational' documentaries about disability

  • 4

    Sensato

    What a shame. When oil prices were rising the government offered solid incentives geared to encouraging companies to invest in solar business opportunities, but has since pulled the rug out from under their feet by reeling back those programs.

    Some years ago it seemed like Japan might become a global leader in solar, not so much anymore. Missed opportunity.

    Posted in: Solar firm bankruptcies hit record high for 1st half of 2016

  • 6

    Sensato

    you’ll actually only save 50 – 80 yen total, but any savings are worth it, we suppose

    The headline of this article claims that "McDonald’s Japan to introduce a super cheap Value Lunch menu," but the article goes on to say that the savings are only 50 to 80 yen (roughly 15%). A bit misleading.

    Posted in: McDonald’s Japan to introduce a super cheap Value Lunch menu

  • 4

    Sensato

    words (such as “I’ll kill you”) and actions (such as pouring condiments on someone’s head) have a far more menacing tone when coming from a superior rather than a colleague.

    I would say that words such as "I'll kill you" and actions such as pouring condiments on someone's head have an extremely menacing tone whether coming from a superior or a colleague.

    Having said that, I do hear some people in Japan blurt out "死ね!" ("SHIne!," equivalent to "eff off and die!") quite frequently here. That sort of abusive language seems to be taken less seriously here than in many other countries.

    Posted in: Inside the mind of a Japanese manager accused of 'power harassment'

  • 1

    Sensato

    @Aly Rustom

    Excellent assessment of Koizumi. Thumbs up, and I stand corrected.

    Posted in: Koizumi backs sick U.S. sailors who blame Fukushima radiation

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