Star-viking's past comments

  • -1

    Star-viking

    It would seem there is more to this than meets the eye.

    Thumb fractures are serious, and if not treated seriously can leave the person with cripled hands. If the PE teacher did not notify the vice-principal, it shows a lack of understanding of the seriousness of the problem - this might have been reflected in his subsequent interactions with the pupil. If the PE teacher was trying to force the pupil to use their injured hands, I can definitely see how that might have affected the sutdent's mental condition.

    Far too many students graduate out of the school system here with life-affecting conditions.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    Star-viking

    3 Wh of electricity means that if you have 30 of these windows, it can run one bar of an electrical heater for one hour a day...

    Posted in: Organic thin-film PV cells used to create power-generating window

  • -1

    Star-viking

    Hi Aly,

    Japan's death rates can be found on the website of the Statistics Japan website. Most data is given by excel spreadsheet, and the latest for death rates is: http://www.stat.go.jp/data/nenkan/65nenkan/zuhyou/y650226000.xls

    That gives the death rate per 1000 for 50-54 year-olds as 3.5, so you're correct that it is not a massive chance, but it's not unexpected either.

    The only one of the Fukushima Fifty who I recall dying was Plant Manager Masao Yoshida, who was a heavy smoker. He died from throat cancer, a common disease of smokers.

    However, NHK itself has acknowledged that there is a spike in the amount of thyroid radiation in evacuees. Logic does dictate that this due to the disaster.

    NHK is not a reliable scientific source. Here's some letters from researchers to the journal Epidemiology, in response to a poorly undertaken study by Toshihide Tsuda.

    We recently conducted thyroid ultrasound screening, using the same procedures as the Fukushima Health Management Survey, in 4,365 children aged 3–18 years from three Japanese prefectures, and confirmed one patient with papillary thyroid cancer (prevalence, 230 per million).2 Furthermore, we recently reviewed findings of thyroid ultrasound screening conducted in Japan.3 In one survey, 9,988 students underwent thyroid screening and four students (including one foreign student) were subsequently diagnosed with thyroid cancer (prevalence, 300 per million). In another study at Okayama University that examined 2,307 students, three patients with thyroid cancer were found (prevalence, 1,300 per million), while at Keio High School, of 2,868 female students examined, one was found to have thyroid cancer (prevalence, 350 per million). These results show that the prevalence of thyroid cancer detected by advanced ultrasound techniques in other areas of Japan does not differ meaningfully from that in Fukushima Prefecture.

    http://journals.lww.com/epidem/Fulltext/2016/05000/Re___Thyroid_Cancer_Among_Young_People_in.31.aspx

    I must, therefore, concur with Dr. Davis that “these findings do not add anything new regarding radiation-induced thyroid cancer.” But I would further add that publishing studies that use ecologic study designs without acknowledging the issue of ecologic fallacy is a disservice to the people of Fukushima, who have already suffered greatly and do not need the added burden of groundless worry about their risk of thyroid cancer—a risk level that most epidemiologists would consider very small, notwithstanding the Tsuda study.

    http://journals.lww.com/epidem/Fulltext/2016/05000/Re___Thyroid_Cancer_Among_Young_People_in.30.aspx

    Tsuda et al.1 evaluated the prevalence of thyroid cancer among children and adolescents after the Fukushima accident in zones of different level of radiation contamination. Based on the numbers in their Table 1, I calculated the means of thyroid cancer prevalence in three zones of radiation contamination (low, middle, high); the least contaminated area (Northeastern, Western, Southeastern, Iwaki City), the combined four districts with intermediate contamination (North middle, Central middle, Koriyama City, South middle), and the nearest area to the crippled reactor (Fig.). The error bars in the Figure indicate 95% confidence intervals. It is hard to see any association of thyroid cancer prevalence with radiation contamination. This makes it difficult to accept that radiation has caused an increase of thyroid cancer among children and adolescents in Fukushima Prefecture during 2011–2014.

    http://journals.lww.com/epidem/Fulltext/2016/05000/Re___Thyroid_Cancer_Among_Young_People_in.32.aspx

    All these quotes are from scientific researchers, some anti-nuclear, commenting on claims of a thyroid cancer epedemic in Fukushima. More comments can be found in the letters section at: http://journals.lww.com/epidem/toc/2016/05000

    I hope you find them helpful.

    Posted in: TEPCO spots possible nuclear fuel debris beneath Fukushima reactor

  • 2

    Star-viking

    Aly,

    On the other hand: http://www.who.int/ionizingradiation/ae/fukushima/faqs-fukushima/en/

    AGAIN your link DOESN'T work. Page doesn't exist. Just like the facts you present.

    In less than 5 seconds I found the page. Corrected URL is:

    http://www.who.int/ionizing_radiation/a_e/fukushima/faqs-fukushima/en/

    There were no acute radiation injuries or deaths among the workers or the public due to exposure to radiation resulting from the FDNPS accident.

    Yes there were. Some of the fukushima 50 are now dead.

    Take any group of 50 middle-aged men. Chances are that after 5 years some will have died.

    OF COURSE TEPCO's stupid line is we can't prove that the sudden spike in thyroid cancer has something to do with it, but any rational person knows that's the case.

    WHO says:

    There have been recent reports about thyroid cancer cases being diagnosed among children exposed to low doses of radioactive iodine as a result of the Fukushima accident. These reports should be interpreted with caution.... the highly-sensitive thyroid screening of those under 18 years old at the time of the accident is expected to detect a large number of thyroid cysts and solid nodules, including a number of thyroid cancers that would not have been detected without such intensive screening. Similar or even slightly higher rates of cysts and nodules were found in prefectures not affected by the nuclear accident.

    Posted in: TEPCO spots possible nuclear fuel debris beneath Fukushima reactor

  • 3

    Star-viking

    Uwe,

    What the article does not say, is that those acceptable limits have been raised up a few times since the Nuclear accident. Just look up the internenational acceptable limits prior to 2011 and compare those with the Japanese Government limits of 2017.

    Can you provide any links or number to back up you claim? I ask because acceptable radiocaesium went from 500 Bq/kg to 100 Bq/kg in 2012

    http://www.mhlw.go.jp/english/topics/2011eq/dl/new_standard.pdf

    Article Unavailable

  • -1

    Star-viking

    Bertie,

    Futenma is apparently going to be returned, but this has been promised so many times, is it surprising that no one believes it?

    This might come as a revalation, but the plan was to move the Futenma facilities to Henoko, then return Futenma. Since the Okinawan Govt. has continuously sabotaged the move to Henoko, Futenma cannot be returned.

    I do find it amazing that some Okinawans can complain about being betrayed when the situation is of their own making. Too self-absorbed I guess - every wrong is someone else's fault.

    Article Unavailable

  • 0

    Star-viking

    No problem Borscht.

    You're totally correct that things were worse because of the rushed nature of the evacuation. An orderly evacuation would be better, but there would still be problems with making sure the patients recieved appropriate care at their destinations, and problems for those where evening moving them could worsen their conditions.

    Posted in: Power failures and other problems do not necessarily result in disaster, and some people become unwell or suffer from worsened medical symptoms during evacuation.

  • -1

    Star-viking

    Borscht,

    I do think you are reading his intent wrong. About evacuation, he is probably referring to the large number of senior citizens whose conditions worsened when they were hastily moved from their hospital beds during the Fukushima accident. As for his comment about power failures and other problems - that was probably in reference to Daini's SFP3 losing cooling for a little over an hour in the recent quake off Fukushima.

    Posted in: Power failures and other problems do not necessarily result in disaster, and some people become unwell or suffer from worsened medical symptoms during evacuation.

  • 1

    Star-viking

    papaguilo,

    Wasn't Tohoku also hit by a 7.3 a few days before the big one? Now I don't want to fear-monger but perhaps its time to prepare those emergency kits, like now.

    No, the big one came out of the blue. We had a large aftershock a month later though, which is probably what you are thinking about.

    Posted in: M7.4 quake strikes off Fukushima, triggering tsunami

  • -1

    Star-viking

    So eliminating jobs will increase jobs?

    Or the same number of workers can do more work for the same effort - increasing efficiency.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    Star-viking

    Sensei258

    I once found a man's wallet loaded (yes I looked) with 150,000 yen, suica card, credit cards, drivers license etc etc on the floor of the train just after it arrived in Hachioji. I held it up as I walked to the service desk to turn it in. I stood nearby to watch as an older man claimed it. The fist thing he did was open it and check the money.

    If you hand it in to the police you can get a percentage of the money in the wallet as a finder's fee.

    Posted in: The weird and wonderful things people leave behind on Japanese trains

  • 1

    Star-viking

    How did she get broken ribs if he hit her on the head with a rock?

    She was on a bridge - probably fell or forcefully pushed against the railings.

    Posted in: Woman attacked by man as she walks home

  • -4

    Star-viking

    Governor Mitazono,

    I want you to renounce the belief that Kagoshima City is safe.

    I want you to renounce the belief that news pundits can pronounce verdicts on areas their education is lacking in.

    Posted in: I want you to renounce the belief that nuclear plants are safe.

  • 5

    Star-viking

    Built with financial support from the Dutch, British and Swedish lotteries, Ocean Warrior could make a real difference, Sea Shepherd said.

    Once again, piss-poor reporting by AFP. Ocean Warrior was not funded by any of the listed national lotteries, it was private lotteries which provided the funds.

    Posted in: Sea Shepherd enlists fast ship to outrun Japanese whaling fleet

  • 0

    Star-viking

    5SpeedRacer5

    I am worried about the rice more than anything.

    Yup! About a decade ago Akita lost most of its rice crop to an insanely heavy rain storm. Not something that needs repeating in Tohoku!

    Posted in: Typhoon hits Tohoku, causing blackouts, traffic chaos

  • 4

    Star-viking

    She noted there is a Japanese word that expresses the idea — “mottainai,” meaning “what a waste.” For instance, Koike said, the idea is demonstrated in the Japanese Shinto tradition of rebuilding the holiest shrine of Ise every 20 years, in which some old materials are reused.

    I thought that the idea was more "waste not". I have to say that her example is pretty poor - if a shrine must be rebuilt every 20 years, regardless of the condition of the building, then it is a big waste. The time, planning, and resources would be better spent on something else.

    Posted in: Koike says she will push for cost-efficient Olympics, women's rights agenda

  • 5

    Star-viking

    Terrible news. RIP little Rina.

    Posted in: Body of child found in river confirmed as that of missing 7-year-old girl

  • 0

    Star-viking

    SenseNoSoCommon,

    Point 1: Kyodo are scaremongering about 'Toxic Water'. Point 2: the radioactive debris is not going anywhere.

    Christopher O'Loughlin,

    Toxicity involves dose, and Kyodo just labels anything with reported radioactivity as 'Toxic'. Additionally, run-off from the plant is trapped in the sealed port.

    On the subject of the cores, Muon detection has located Reactor 2's in it's containment vessel, and that is most probably where therest are.

    Article Unavailable

  • -1

    Star-viking

    If Mitazono trully had his prefecture's citizens at heart, he'd be reviewing the safety of Kagoshima City. An incident at the Sendai Plant would probably result in zero deaths, and with the post-Fukushima safety measures - no evacuation zones. With Kagoshima City, any evacuation problems in the event of a major eruption would leave thousands dead.

    Article Unavailable

  • -1

    Star-viking

    SenseNotSoCommon,

    The problem with the sentence is you cut off the end of the sentence, and that, funnily enough, changes its meaning.

    Now, on the topic of the readings, common sense does not do you much good if you do not research or think about a topic.

    The radiation readings are being taken for the trenches - which means that the workers have to walk over to a trench, and retrieve water from that trench. The trenches surround Reactors 1-4, which ejected significant amounts of radioactive material 5 years ago. That raises the issue that some areas around the reactor are too dangerous to approach, and if the workers would have to traverse these areas to get to a sampling point, then they can't go and get a sample from that point.

    University-level stuff, old bean.

    Article Unavailable

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