Tessa's past comments

  • 7

    Tessa

    Oh boy. The stories I can share!

    Let me first state that the care that I've received in Japan has been incredibly efficient, if not exactly sympathetic. However, some of these "doctors" really need to brush up on their people skills.

    The doctor who performed my emergency appendectomy (brilliantly, by the way) actually told me just before the op that I was the first gaijin he had ever operated on, so he was a bit nervous about the outcome. Imagine how I felt.

    The doctor who diagnosed my gallstones told me that he'd never encountered such a young patient before (I was 33 at the time) and that it was obviously caused by my decadent foreign lifestyle and eating habits.

    The doctor who diagnosed my mumps - which I caught from a Japanese student, btw - felt the urge to inform me that foreigners have superior salivary glands, which explains our supposedly superior linguistic abilities. He wasn't joking.

    The doctor who wrongly diagnosed my friend as having breast cancer (how can such a thing happen in this day and age?) advised her to start making care plans for her children. Fortunately she got a second opinion. It turned out to be a mere cyst!

    A doctor I met in a nightclub passed around a huge photo album of medical photos of women's genitalia, possibly taken by him or a colleague.

    Another doctor showed up in one of my English classes, wanting to improve his communication skills. He had been sued for medical malpractice by a patient. He seemed like a nice guy, but frankly his bedside manner was appalling, and I wasn't surprised there were misunderstandings.

    By the way, almost every single one of the above doctors was a second or third generation one. Avoid those guys like the plague!

    Posted in: How to avoid being a 'third-rate patient'

  • 1

    Tessa

    I find the 'this could only happen in Japan' type comments a bit tiring after seeing years of them.

    I live in Japan, I work in Japan, and my whole life is intimately tied up with Japan. Furthermore, I'm commenting on a Japan-based site called Japan Today (in case you hadn't noticed). Naturally, I am not particularly interested in how things are, or aren't, done in other lands. I can and do go elsewhere for that.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    Tessa

    Yep, that's gonna do the trick, Japan! I can just see thousands of young couples running off to produce as many babies as they can, once they get a look at these cute pieces of paper ...

    Posted in: Make a happy occasion even happier with these Sanrio-themed birth registration forms

  • 0

    Tessa

    the situation in many people's home countries is worse...

    What does that have to do with me? I don't live in other countries, and I certainly don't pay taxes to them. Naturally I'm concerned about the situation in Japan. Any normal taxpayer here would be.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    Tessa

    Government sponsored aged care facilities are virtually non-existent. There are many private ones charging ¥200-400,000 per month, but again, this is only minimal care.

    Yes, I've heard all the horror stories. One of my students told me that her father-in-law kept refusing to drink water, and nobody could figure out why until she examined his water bottle - it was moldy because the water hadn't been changed in days.

    So, how about if we stop the 'bad Japan' comments for once and get some knowledge of the disease instead?

    Sounds like somebody has never actually paid into the healthcare system in Japan. Personally, I expect a bit more bang for my buck.

    Article Unavailable

  • 4

    Tessa

    Changi, Changi, all the way, baby! If I could live in that airport, I would (preference would be Terminal 2, but everywhere's good).

    Posted in: 53% of travellers see airports as something to be enjoyed

  • 1

    Tessa

    It was her first appearance for an official duty outside the capital since October when the couple visited Kagoshima Prefecture.

    Wow, nice work if you can get it. She's not exactly setting a good example for the women of Japan, is she?

    Article Unavailable

  • -2

    Tessa

    There are more than enough Japanese women that quit their jobs after getting married that can be coerced into going back to study and work if the salaries were there.

    I absolutely agree with you. I would go further and say that Japanese housewives should be forced to get off their lazy butts and earn their keep, for a change. Like many salaried workers, I am sick and tired of carrying their load.

    Posted in: As more elderly people require special treatment due to dementia and other illnesses in Japan, what should the government do to increase the number of nursing care workers and caregivers? For example, is bringing in more such workers from overseas the best answer?

  • 0

    Tessa

    At least they've stopped doing that thing with the baby chicks. Haven't they?

    Posted in: Goldfishing

  • 10

    Tessa

    Ask any Japanese person and you'll find that Buddhist monks aren't particularly well respected anymore.

    Recently I had a hand in organising a field trip to a local temple for some foreign students. The head priest behaved like such an old lech that I felt embarrassed for Japan.

    Article Unavailable

  • -2

    Tessa

    The mere fact that I don't remember ever having read any of this shows me that you're heavily exaggerating. For what purpose?

    You obviously don't read Japanese.

    Posted in: Abandoned boy reflects Japan's attitude on discipline, abuse

  • 0

    Tessa

    A horrifying story, but good to see that Japan has come so far in such a short time, regarding animal rights. It'll be interesting to see what kind of sentence he receives.

    Posted in: Man arrested for kicking his dog to death

  • 1

    Tessa

    You did say, back in the day....

    Meaning 1999, not the Mesozoic Era.

    Posted in: Abandoned boy reflects Japan's attitude on discipline, abuse

  • -4

    Tessa

    Have you not been tossed out of a car by an angry parent?? I have ... brought back some funny childhood memories.

    Me too. I remember my mother bringing the car to a screeching halt and screaming at me and my siblings to get out of the car (we had been quarrelling in the back seat). After a few minutes, she cooled off and told us to get back in. The rest of the drive continued in complete silence. The worst part for me was biting my lip, trying not to laugh ...

    Posted in: Should the parents of the 7-year-old boy who spent six days in a Hokkaido mountain forest after being forced out of the family car for misbehaving, face some sort of criminal charges?

  • 3

    Tessa

    I'm sure they'll get the hang of it eventually, it's not as if there's never been a historical precedent for "Japanese going abroad en masse and killing people."

    Posted in: Even if I could pull the trigger, I would probably close my eyes.

  • 0

    Tessa

    Back in the UK.

    Seriously? that must be a generational thing. I have never heard of anyone being sent outside as a punishment, ever. I used to get sent to my room if I was naughty, and that was pretty standard. (Actually, I then used to sneak out of my room and race outside to the yard and poke faces at my mother through the kitchen window as she washed the dishes. That probably wasn't standard.)

    Mum used to make everyone laugh with her tales of how when I was a baby she would leave me outside a shop in the pram.

    My own mother, who apparently was a "good baby" with very regular habits, used to be left napping at home alone whilst my gran did the grocery shopping. But it wasn't pachinko, and it certainly didn't make the international headlines.

    Posted in: Abandoned boy reflects Japan's attitude on discipline, abuse

  • 0

    Tessa

    I don't know what part of Japan you're in, but here in Kyoto, the people I've asked about the Nihon/Nippon thing, is (from what I've been told) that Nippon is an old way of saying it, and that these days Nihon is more used.

    Okay, thanks. She was old, that might explain it.

    Discovered by Riken? Hontonium?

    Okay, I got that. Two thumbs up!

    How about just "arrogantium", or "jimantium?"

    Or how about just "penisenvium?"

    Article Unavailable

  • 3

    Tessa

    Do they not quite understand the meaning of "self-defense?" These guys remind me of the students who show for my English 101 class, and then get shocked when they are actually expected to speak English during the lesson! (No, seriously, the dean asked me not to use so much English in my English conversation classes ...)

    Posted in: Even if I could pull the trigger, I would probably close my eyes.

  • 5

    Tessa

    Oh, I've been here too long. I can remember a certain TV programme that featured small children being separated from their mothers, and being told that they were never coming back. How the panels laughed to see their reactions! Does anyone else remember this?

    Back in the day, it wasn't uncommon, in certain low-rent areas, to see babies in prams left outside pachinko parlours.

    One of my students told me me, between gasps of laughter, that her pubescent daughter still bathes with her father, and that dad pats the girl's chest and tells her proudly "you're getting bigger now!" (Another student gigglingly told me that her little girl complained that "daddy's poop was floating in the bath water" but that's not really relevant here.)

    And how many of you remember being annoyed by neighbourhood kids who had been locked outside as punishment by their parents, banging on the doors and screaming and crying to be let in? At least a few of those kids gave up and wandered off elsewhere (I should know, I was hauled out to help search for one of them, who was quickly found sitting on the swings in a local park).

    Actually, maybe it's not me who has been here too long ... it's those of you who think that this is all normal and acceptable, and also that all children in other countries are gang members.

    Posted in: Abandoned boy reflects Japan's attitude on discipline, abuse

  • 4

    Tessa

    Why can't they call it Nipponium? It's far easier to pronounce.

    A few days ago, in conversation with an elderly lady, I was berated (quite rudely, by the way) for referring to Japan as "Nihon" instead of "Nippon." According to her, no-one calls it that, ever. Confusing.

    Article Unavailable

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