cleo's past comments

  • 1

    cleo

    I went to work for myself. It's too bad that Iwasaki-san and others don't do the same. If more people started more small businesses and companies, we wouldn't be stuck with a glut of under-performing and underpaying zombie companies.

    The vast majority of those new start-ups fail: 85~95% fold within 5 to 10 years. If you have been successful, you are one of the lucky ones.

    Posted in: Hard work yields no rewards; Y4 million salary barrier is impenetrable

  • 2

    cleo

    To some extent, M3M3M3 and philly1 are both right.

    Translation does require bloody hard with great subtlety of mind, and is often given very little credit, or at least not the credit that a good job well done deserves. People tend to think it's a lot easier than it is. To be a good translator, you need to be both fluent and literate to a high degree in both languages. Not many people are. Heck, lots of folk aren't literate to a high degree in their native language, never mind a second language.

    At the same time, (maybe because of a lack of good translators?) we've all seen the results of work done by M3M3M3's type of translator. Maybe there are more of them than the good type, or perhaps we don't notice or remark on the good stuff, while the abysmal stuff tends to punch us in the face when we come across it.

    I've done a stint as an English teacher and as a generic sarari(wo)man, and for the past lawd knows how long I've earned a living as a translator. I don't 'moonlight', it's my job. M3M3M3's mention of 'atrocious rates of pay' has me scratching my head; I earn way more as a translator than I ever did as an English teacher or in an office, even allowing for inflation, and for fewer hours. Translators may be a dime a dozen if you're not concerned about quality, but in my experience there is a severe shortage of good J-E translators, and companies are willing to pay a premium for good work.

    I'm more than happy with, and proud of, my 'just a job', and I would never go back to English teaching or office work.

    Posted in: Finding work in Japan: If you don't want to teach English, don't

  • 2

    cleo

    Both men and women should be free to choose their own path. That said, if that path includes children somewhere along the way, then provision needs to be made for them and their needs should come before any thoughts of career. Up to the age of three at least, longer if possible, there should be a parent at home caring for the child full-time.

    Three kids spaced an average of two or so years apart means a 'career gap' of around seven or eight years. It isn't so much a 'gap' as a 'switch'; raising kids is a full-time, strenuous and arduous career. It's not a career for a lazy person.

    being a housewife would depend on the Men having enough Finances! Men are basically ATM's in this country. Where is the love or caring for the husband & family & working together to built a great household as well as being financially stable?

    If one half of the couple is at home raising kids and not earning an income, then the other partner needs to be able to earn enough to cover that. Men (usually) do need to have enough finances if the family is to be financially stable through the child-rearing years. Duuh.

    Disclaimer: we were DINKS until the first baby came along, then by mutual consent I left my paying job to be a full-time mother, which I remained until the younger child hit kindergarten. Then I was able to do a bit of PT, from home, so that I was always there when the kids came home from school. As school hours lengthened so did my working hours. Now they've both flown the nest and I work freelance - FT, but I can choose my own hours. If you have a job in an ordinary company, working hours as flexible as mine probably isn't on the cards; but if instead of stressing 'getting mothers back to work instead of being 'only' housewives', more attention were paid to accepting that mothers need reasonable time off for child-raising and that being at home with a toddler is not 'being lazy'★, possibly more young women would feel able to have children.

    ★Anyone who seriously thinks this has no idea what is involved in raising a child and deserves a slap up the back of the head with a large, preferably frozen, fish. There's a lot more to it than keeping its bottom clean and its belly full.

    Posted in: Do young Japanese women want to be housewives?

  • 5

    cleo

    The US is in Japan for its own purposes, not to protect Japan (any more than it is in Germany to protect Germany, or in the UK to protect Her Majesty's sceptr'd isle. The very idea.). They have their own reasons for being here, and as such they should be willing to pay for the privilege. I wouldn't say 100%, since Japan does get something out of the arrangement. The US should pay at the very least for the land it uses, as Bertie suggests, and also compensation for the noise pollution from jets flying low overhead at all hours, the marine pollution from pushing runways out over the reefs, the chemical pollution from the (unsafe) storage of toxic agents and for the nuisance factor of drunken GIs invading private property, raping local women, etc and traffic being forced to make huge detours because of the sprawling bases taking up so much space. Not to mention the ruckus when a Top Secret US Military Aircraft drops on top of a local school and the US military cordons off the whole area for days.

    An unbiased calculation of who gets what out of the US being in Japan and who should be paying who, would I think make Donald wish he had kept his uninformed trap shut. But then, he admits that all he knows is what he reads on the Internet, so he's unlikely to let anything like facts change his opinion.

    Japan should not be paying as much as it is now. The US should be paying Japan compensation.

    Posted in: U.S. President-elect Donald Trump wants Japan to pay more of the costs for hosting U.S. military bases. Should Japan pay more?

  • 2

    cleo

    By far and away, 3/11.

    Posted in: What is the worst natural disaster you have experienced?

  • 0

    cleo

    Live without pets? Never. Not for long, anyways.

    Posted in: 3 things to consider before getting a pet in Japan

  • 12

    cleo

    The remarks made to Mr. Pence are absolutely deplorable

    I just read the transcript of the speech, and I think you must have read something completely different. There is nothing deplorable, hateful or even disrespectful or rude in the speech. If Mr Pence cannot handle being on the receiving end of Vice President-elect Pence, we welcome you and we truly thank you for joining us here at Hamilton: An American Musical, we really do. We, sir, we are the diverse America who are alarmed and anxious that your new administration will not protect us — our planet, our children, our parents — or defend us and uphold our inalienable rights, sir. But we truly hope that this show has inspired you to uphold our American values and to work on behalf of all of us. All of us. Again, we truly thank you for sharing this show. This wonderful American story told by a diverse group of men [and] women of different colors, creeds, and orientations. - then maybe he and his boss are far too thin-skinned to be leading a chorus of The Grand Old duke of York, never mind the most powerful country on Earth.

    Posted in: Debate over 'Hamilton' speech exposes post-election cracks

  • 8

    cleo

    Wow. How sad do you have to be to thumbs-down everyone's favourite snacks?

    Posted in: What are some of your favorite Japanese snacks currently on the market?

  • 4

    cleo

    Ours used to ignore her own bowl of water, but would happily drink from the dog's bowl.

    De dog does not has a bowl of water. Everything wot is in de house is belongs to de cat, every feline knows this.

    Posted in: Science marches on, with no-melt ice cream and extended kitty longevity

  • 0

    cleo

    The vast majority of elderly do own their own homes and thus don't face such housing costs

    Some 70% of elderly own their own homes, which means a significant minority of 30% , don't.

    http://www.stat.go.jp/data/jyutaku/2008/nihon/9_1.htm

    What's the point of savings if it is just handed over to the government in death tax anyway?

    You realise how much you need to have in savings for the govmint to rake in taxes when you pop it? In 2013, 4.3% of estates were liable to inheritance tax (It is a tax on inheritance, not on death). The estates of 96.7% of deaths paid no inheritance tax at all. http://www.jili.or.jp/lifeplan/houseeconomy/succession/8.html

    Meanwhile the average savings of an elderly household is 13.42 million yen. The govmint isn't going to be paying off the national debt from that.

    http://www.chokin-ginko.com/kiso/chokingaku.html

    The pension scam / scheme is not something that one pays into

    Mmm, yes it is. And if you think that isn't reliable, or isn't going to be enough, there are private pension/investment/insurance schemes to choose from, too.

    It's the lesser of two evils to pay for such types (the vast minority I believe), rather than pay for them as well as all the rich elderly who can care for themselves

    Anyone can rant. Let's see some figures to back up your claims that the feckless poor are a 'vast minority' and that the ranks of the elderly are swarming with rich people. I've already shown that average savings are not huge at all. If the average is not being warped downwards by large numbers of poor elderly, there's no way 'all the elderly' are awash with riches. (If out of 100 people 99 have 100 yen each and 1 person has 1 million yen, the average is 10,099 yen each: but that is not an accurate reflection of the situation, is it?) If as you insist very few people are poor and the vast majority are rich, how come the average chokin is so low?

    Article Unavailable

  • 0

    cleo

    do those elderly households face monthly rent or mortgage payments, or bear the cost of educating their children too? I think not.

    Those living in rented accommodation likely do pay rent, yes. Someone who gets only a basic pension likely gets only a basic pension because they didn't earn that much and if they didn't earn that much, they probably couldn't afford a mortgage. And with people marrying later and later, lots of folk in their sixties do still have kids in college.

    Providing for yourself in old age is one of the reasons that people save money in the first place.

    You mean like paying into a pension scheme?

    Rich people should look after themselves. I don't want to help rich people.

    Pay in according to your means, take out according to your needs. Makes sense to me.

    I'm happy to help people who can't look after themselves

    You mean you're happy to pay for those who couldn't be bothered to provide for themselves in old age, spending money on wine, women, song and foreign holidays instead of paying into a pension scheme, but you want to discriminate against those who exactly did what you say everyone should do?

    Average household income will be distorted in the same way as individual income

    Yes of course it will. That wasn't my point, I was picking up on koiwaicoffee's suspicion that the average income of older workers and retired people is at least twice the income of young families with kids. It isn't, nowhere near. The wealthier older people may be stinkin' rich, but there aren't that many of them.

    Article Unavailable

  • 4

    cleo

    In Japan 70% of people do not make average income. It's getting on for 3 million a year for women, and only that high due to teachers, nurses, and women in career positions who are over 35 and quite possibly never married. Few married women with kids will make anything like that, unless they are nurses, teachers, or in some other qualification-based job.

    The figures in my link are for households, not individuals.

    Article Unavailable

  • 2

    cleo

    an original blend of egg white, thick malt syrup and a coagulant

    That does not sound appetising. ('Fancy a snack, dear? Got a nice bit of coagulant here' 'Yum!')

    Cats, in general, don’t ingest a lot of water,

    They're likely to ignore a bowl of standing water, even if it's refreshed several times a day, but will quite happily drink running water if it's available. I have a drinking fountain for my cat, both she and the dog use it several times a day.

    From tests so far, he’s confident that his procedure will promote kidney health in cats, while displaying no harmful side effects.

    No harmful effects on the mice? (Like being killed to 'harvest' the AIM?)

    Posted in: Science marches on, with no-melt ice cream and extended kitty longevity

  • 1

    cleo

    My favourite at the moment is a thing called Okara Chips, made by a company called Danran that markets through my local Coop. They're a salty crispy soy-based snack that comes packed in providentially small individual servings. They're very moreish.

    When I want something sweet, a beany-based Daifuku hits the spot. Or a taiyaki. Or an Obanyaki, especially the custard/chocolatey ones.

    Posted in: What are some of your favorite Japanese snacks currently on the market?

  • 5

    cleo

    I suspect the average income of older workers and retired people is at least twice the income of young families with kids

    No need to suspect anything. Mr. Google is your friend.

    According to the Ministry of Health and Welfare, in 2015 roughly a quarter of all households were 'elderly households' (comprising only people aged 65 and over, or those aged 65 and over and unmarried children under the age of 18): of these, 49.1% were single households and 47.2% were married couples. Of the single households, 68% were single females.

    The average income of an elderly household in 2015 was 2.973 million yen, or roughly 55% the national average household income of 5.419 million yen. 55% of households receiving a public or company pension have no other income.

    3.7% of all households reported that they were financially comfortable or very comfortable, compared to 2.8% of elderly households and 4.1% of households with small children.

    https://seniorguide.jp/article/1010238.html

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    cleo

    The young single Japanese females I've known and dated over the years, and their friends, were...

    ...Todai students? Really?

    Posted in: University of Tokyo to assist new female students with Y30,000 a month for rent

  • 4

    cleo

    Never understood why my spouse had to continue to pay income taxes even after she had stopped working to have our children.

    If she didn't have an income, she couldn't be paying income tax. Perhaps you're confusing it with residential tax, which is calculated on the previous year's income.

    As for lowering the age of majority - I don't see the point. The vast majority of teenagers (not only in Japan) are kids, not ready for adult responsibility. Of course becoming a responsible adult isn't something that happens suddenly one day, it's a gradual process and people mature at different rates, and for legal purposes a cut-off point has to be fixed somewhere. I see nothing wrong with it being fixed at 20 or 21, in Japan and elsewhere.

    Most 18-year-olds are not adult.

    Article Unavailable

  • 2

    cleo

     Todai is a public university, so the tuition is a standard ¥535,800 a year. The problem isn't finding people who can afford it, it's finding folk who can pass the entrance exams.

    As an aside, apparently a little over half of all Todai students come from families with income over ¥10 million, and only 13.5% from families with income below the national average. And nearly a third of all entrants are from the Tokyo area.

    If this housing allowance helps address these imbalances, I think that would be a good thing and a boost to social mobility. But as others have noted, restricting the financial help to females only seems a bit off. It should be based on distance, family income and academic level.

    http://todo-ran.com/t/kijis/12088 (Numbers of entrance exam passes, not enrollments: but they're probably not much different.)

    http://www.nenshuu.net/sonota/contents/toudai.php (Family income)

    Posted in: University of Tokyo to assist new female students with Y30,000 a month for rent

  • 3

    cleo

    Todai has lots of spare cash. My son and his postgrad colleagues got 'study trips' to Europe paid for out of the uni coffers.

    Pity that Tokyo University has to be in Tokyo, though.

    Posted in: University of Tokyo to assist new female students with Y30,000 a month for rent

  • 12

    cleo

    There was a time I would have been confident that even with the LDP two-thirds majority the Japanese public would never ever vote in favour of scrapping Article 9.

    But after the debacle of Brexit in the UK and the Trump snafu in the US, I would no longer be at all surprised if Japan elected itself to be the third of the three plonkers.

    I hope I'm wrong. Oh, how I hope I'm wrong.

    Article Unavailable

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