philly1's past comments

  • 4

    philly1

    Twaddle. There's more than one non sequitur in these arguments. Lots of gaps in correlation/causation. No citing of any science there may be to back up the claims.

    Consumed in moderation, any of the items discussed do no harm to any bodies--Japanese or otherwise--unless you have a severe intolerance or allergy. As part of a balanced and varied diet the foods and beverages listed may offer some health benefit in addition to the gastronomic pleasure of enjoying them. To create disease by enjoying anything cited above, you'd have to have grossly overindulged for years.

    Posted in: Health diets from overseas flooding Japan, but are they right for Japanese bodies?

  • 6

    philly1

    There is no reason why a grace period of (say) two years can't be created during which time both old and new forms and documents would be accepted. During that time old ones could be used up and new ones brought in by (say) January 1, 2020. That also gives people plenty of time to use up old stock of calendars and the like.

    Nothing is really all that difficult once a decision is made to do it. After that it's a question of how (as well as how simple or complicated you are going to make it).

    All that's required is will and imagination. Not even all that much imagination. Done.

    Posted in: Emperor's abdication eyed for his birthday in 2018: source

  • 1

    philly1

    Ironic. In the beginning she was disparaged (in this very forum) as an ignorant light-weight. Her appointment was considered a "fluffy" one. A favour from the President like a bon-bon. A vacation-style opportunity to enjoy life in Japan.

    Posted in: I think most people don’t know about this, but Ambassador Kennedy was an exceptionally tough negotiator. When I could persuade her, I could persuade Washington, D.C., as well. On the contrary, when she gave me a firm negative response, I thought it was time for the Japanese side to come up with an alternative idea.

  • 2

    philly1

    Rightsided, I was thinking the same thing. Might as well get a jump on Halloween and Christmas, too. Heck, let's have all the holidays and all the trimmings all year round. They've become banal by the time they arrive anyway. Why wait for them to start?

    Posted in: Ready for Valentine's Day

  • 1

    philly1

    you can't change people, work with them or exploit their weakness.

    When my wife gets hysterical I tend to do what she says. (teehee)

    we need the press to stop obsessing themselves about him! He isn't the centre of the Universe!

    When you can't work with people because they are impossible, you must exploit their weaknesses. But to do so, you must remember the words of Lao Tzu: A good army does not reveal its weapons. The target can't know what you are up to.

    When a wife gets hysterical you may do what she says, but you probably don't call her hysterical. Not if you want to win the day. Plus, you probably only appear to do what she says while pleasing yourself in round about ways. And you probably pay less and less attention to anything she says.

    If the press did not feed this man's ego by printing every twit (I mean tweet) thing and left the "news" to his followers on Twitter, that would help. If, at the next press conference no one showed up but the tabloids. An organized media blackout against "fake news" would be sweet revenge (not to mention relief) indeed.

    Perhaps it's time for the press to take it's blinkers off and look at the more newsworthy news of the world for the next four years. Leave the mess in Washington to diplomats and governments who are paid and elected to deal with it, and those businesses who must now cope with the changed landscape.

    Leave this problem to the Americans. They created it. It's up to them to clean it up.

    Posted in: Abe's aide brands Trump 'hysterical'

  • -3

    philly1

    To those of you that think students should be taught about it in school.... where is the relivence in making them feel guilt for their country when they had no choice?

    It's not guilt they are supposed to feel. They are supposed to gain an intellectual understanding of atrocities and deepen their own commitment to avoid repetition of the warped views and mistakes of their brutal ancestors.

    At present, few countries anywhere have created truly egalitarian societies. Most nations still struggle under the taint of millennia-old, deeply entrenched and largely unconscious notions of women (and children) as chattel and booty of war. Unfortunately, these ideas are supported in religious texts.

    For example, the Bible (Old Testament) describes women and children (along with sheep and goats) as the measure of a man's wealth, as well as the natural plunder of war. Such systemic ideas of tribal societies living times very different from ours no longer fit human kind's transition into a globalized world. Most of us would likely agree with that intellectually, however, in practice the subjugation of women occurs largely without significant censure everywhere. Why is that? Well, in Western democracies, the idea of equality and the vote--and even women's status as persons--is less than 100 years old. Change never happens quickly. History teaches us that.

    That's why we must establish for the coming generations--every single individual--that sexism, misogyny, and brutality against women (as well as others) is wrong. There is no shame in acknowledging that our ancestors had a more limited world view that we simply cannot condone. We all must make our uneasy peace with what our countries have done and speak against it. As a Canadian, even though I am not responsible for committing the abuse, the interment of Japanese Canadian citizens during World War II is something I need to understand and abhor. As is the ongoing prejudice against the indigenous peoples of this land and the present inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women.

    Posted in: Japan recalls envoys from S Korea over 'comfort woman' statue

  • 1

    philly1

    Toyota will be here longer than Trump who may last only 4 years. Wise of Toyota to steer their business course as the company president has articulated. After the Fords bought over the next 4 years fall apart, people won't mind spending more for a Toyota.

    Posted in: Toyota is latest Trump target over Mexico production plans

  • 1

    philly1

    Thanks Sarah! What a lovely idea. Of course, you can use pre-made pasta that is not dried; however, that's a costlier option. Taste is great, but a good quality dried Italian pasta is excellent, too.

    Posted in: The secret to a better pasta? Bake it

  • 2

    philly1

    These elderly people see the news (over 50yrs watching this happen)and know people die every year eating mochi, how is warning them gonna change anything? It's like warning people about eating fugu fish, they know they can die but still do it.

    And many people don't know that hot dogs pose the same choking hazard for children. A hazard easily eliminated by slicing the wiener and spreading it wide rather than leaving it round. Do people change their habits? No. Every year children die. Ever heard about it?

    Not much you can do about the vagaries of people compromising their safety in all sorts of ways. Add dementia into the mochi mix for the elderly, and death is inevitable for a few. Sadly, shoganai.

    Posted in: Authorities urge elderly people to be careful when eating 'mochi'

  • 5

    philly1

    My mother's cognitive impairment before her death was mild. She could engage socially and look after almost everything herself except driving, banking and thinking ahead in certain cognitive areas. (She knew she needed to make meals and ate well, but she couldn't be relied on to take her medication properly. Therefore, she needed blister packs to organize them for her.)

    To assist her I took care of the finances. Plus I organized a cleaning service to do the heavy jobs like vacuuming and clean the bathrooms. That way she didn't risk falling in the tub. A nurse came every six weeks to take care of her feet as she no longer had the strength to clip her toenails. Once a week a driving service took her to shop for groceries which she could do independently until the week she went into hospital. The driver carried the bags for her. Over the 5 years after my father's death, they became her friends and happily looked out for her. She got extra attention that her other children (who each lived 8 hours away) could not provide.

    Given her mild impairment and that I lived .5 km away, could I have done all that myself? Yes. However, having others' watchful eyes on her who could alert me to concerns she might hide from me was very helpful. Also, like many people, my mother behaved better with strangers than with me. Sometimes she could be mean, obstinate and demanding, but she didn't show that side to the public or her friends. Arranged this way we were all happier. My outings with my mother could be pleasant occasions such as shopping for shoes or enjoying lunch in a restaurant.

    In a case where a person is more severely impaired this dynamic changes drastically. When my mother needed acute care I could not provide it. I did not have the training or skill set required. When the end came she went directly to palliative care via Emergency from her home. For those who linger for years at home--incontinent and sometimes violent--the burden on the caregiver is severe. Most end up in that role by virtue of gender and geography. Most don't have the skills to assist their parents or the time to acquire them.

    The extra level of service the agencies described can provide the elderly will be a godsend to families. It eases the burden on the caregivers enormously.

    Tess, you "know" too many awful people. However, you don't know the individual dynamics in those relationships that cause the calloused attitudes. If you give it some thought, there might be good reasons you are not privy to, reasons not to let a demented parent dominate one's life. Even so, I hope you don't judge everyone else based on them.

    Posted in: Private detective agency to keep eye on senile seniors

  • 4

    philly1

    Trump 'isn't ready to accept the finding by intelligence officials that Moscow hacked Democratic emails in a bid to elevate Trump.' Let's hope he starts getting ready to accept it!

    Maybe Trump doesn't have to accept the finding because he condones it (or if you want to believe the worst without proof, he engineered it).

    Posted in: Trump aides ask of Russian meddling: Does it matter?

  • 12

    philly1

    Well, you can bet that if Hillary had won the election "fair and square" the whinging and accusations from "Camp Donald" would be loud and relentless. Lawsuits would be flying like confetti at a wedding. Indeed, "There's going to be things that individually people may believe in their hearts or in their mind;" however, we are so far down the rabbit hole that the truth doesn't seem to matter. The Apprentice is moving to the White House. And no one gets fired until four years pass.

    Posted in: Trump aides ask of Russian meddling: Does it matter?

  • 1

    philly1

    Why barcodes? Why not register the fingerprints of dementia sufferers and give police scanning apps on their mobiles?

    Good question, Alan. Fingerprint everyone. That way non-Japanese entering and in the country can feel more at home. You're right that a bar code won't help those who wander off until they are found. Neither will fingerprints. Then what? Bar codes with beacons? And how long before those are applied to pets and children and philandering spouses and, and, and...

    Posted in: City tags dementia sufferers with barcodes

  • 1

    philly1

    The author's profile says he's a translator. That's great, but it seems like nearly the same thing as being an English teacher. If he had managed to get a job as a generic salaryman, that would have been something to write about.

    Sorry, with all due respect M3M3M3, a translator is a professional who works bloody hard with great subtlety of mind for very little credit. He or she brings the texts of one language to another. Rendering everything from literature, to technical manuals, medical or pharmaceutical information and more from one language to another is an art form as well as a highly specialized skill. A profession which should not be so grossly disrespected as to suggest that managing to get a generic job of some kind is somehow superior. If you'd ever read numerous possible renderings in English of a single Basho haiku, you'd have some idea of the skill set required.

    Posted in: Finding work in Japan: If you don't want to teach English, don't

  • 2

    philly1

    The best they can do is try to reach an informed consensus which can guide the government's deliberations.

    My bet: A lot of teeth sucking and perhaps the death of the present Emperor before that happens. Once achieved it's mere "guidance" for the "government's deliberations." More teeth sucking and delay.

    Article Unavailable

  • 5

    philly1

    I hate to say it, but this ought to be a wake-up call. It's a good reminder for the need to revisit the succession issue and its dependence on a single male heir. Life is fragile and capricious. There are no guarantees that anyone will live to maturity.

    Article Unavailable

  • 3

    philly1

    Making a rule enforcing isolation is not the only and perhaps not the most imaginative way to solve this kind of problem. Residents could have organized a kick-off condo party to get to know the neighbours. Then they could hold regular easy to organize social events (tea, bingo, exercise classes, games, sing-alongs, movies and speakers etc). These activities would also bring people together. Publishing a directory with photos (on line or on paper) as well as creating a photo bulletin board could support the initiative. If the building is too large, it could be done floor by floor.

    Not everyone in their city does it this way, but that's what my parents' building (in Canada) did. For years the people in 250+ suites have enjoyed a thriving, caring and supportive community--just like a country village within a city. In that scenario, children can differentiate community members from strangers and all residents enjoy the extra protection of caring neighbours. Win-win.

    Posted in: Japanese parents afraid of stranger danger ban on saying hello in their condos

  • 7

    philly1

    Make no mistake,this is not about any child's--especially a two year-old's--independence. It is the first step in establishing the greater social authority of the school and its teachers over the child--and the parents.

    We are taking your two year-old on a secret trip. You will be told nothing about its location, you are not welcome to be present, and there is nothing you can do about it. You are not asked to sign waivers because your permission is irrelevant.

    This is how the children (and the parents) are gradually conditioned away from the home and into the larger social sphere. Before long they will spend more time at school than at home; when they are adults they will spend more time at the company than with the family.

    I'm not fan of helicopter parenting and waiting on a child's every whimper as often happens in North America; however, this has nothing to do with independence. Browny1 is correct. This situation is easier to understand if you have read Anatomy of Dependence by Takeo Doi.

    Posted in: How Japan prepares its children for independence

  • 7

    philly1

    ...it is more important than ever that JETs do their best to prepare their students and colleagues for a more multicultural Japan...

    Sometimes--it varies from one experience to another--JETs are not allowed to do much. Especially anything outside the Japanese instructional box which the teacher in charge or administration isn't creative enough to embrace.

    Article Unavailable

  • 0

    philly1

    One does not normally associate gang violence with Vancouver.

    Just as one does not normally associate crime with Japan, gang & organized crime and the attendant violence is part of the underbelly of any society. Past and present. Gangs have been in Vancouver as well as the rest of the Lower Mainland & Fraser Valley for much more than a decade--most of the 20th century.

    With social media now driving much of the news and news now being much more sensationalist than it was in the past, it's more in the open. Previously it mostly stayed underground. (Literally--if you count the opium dens in the tunnels below Vancouver's Chinatown.)

    Posted in: 1 dead, 2 hurt in multiple stabbings in Vancouver

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